Monthly Archives: October 2012

CNA Responds

Closure of Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station

Hydro-Québec has confirmed the Gentilly-2 nuclear power plant which has been operating safely and reliably since 1983, will stop producing electricity on December 28, 2012. This follows the September 20 announcement by the Government of Québec on its decision to shut down Gentilly-2 rather than proceeding with a refurbishment.

“The Canadian Nuclear Association is disappointed with this decision. The Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station employs roughly 800 people in stable, well trained, well-paid jobs, and powers the equivalent of 275,000 households in Québec,” said Association President and CEO, Denise Carpenter.

The increase in project costs, combined with falling market prices prompted Hydro-Québec to recommend to the Québec government that the generating station be closed. In light of the feedback it has obtained on the complete refurbishment cycle, the company has reassessed the cost of the project to $4.3 billion.

“Hydro-Québec made a decision based on their plant and their economics, for a plant that supplies three per cent of their demand,” continued Carpenter. “However, new project costs are subject to interpretation considering other refurbishment projects in Ontario, where nuclear supplies almost 60 per cent of demand, have lower estimated costs.”

Candu Energy Inc. President and General Manager, Kevin Wallace, has stated Candu Energy Inc. believes the government’s decision to close the Gentilly-2 nuclear facility was made before all options were considered. Candu also hopes that the government will reconsider its decision and engage in further dialogue on a possible lease agreement with a partner to refurbish, operate and potentially decommission the plant.

Despite this announcement, Canada’s nuclear industry is strong and moving forward. In Ontario, nuclear is an integral part of the electricity supply and is expected to continue to account for 50 per cent of the province’s energy supply as indicated in the Government’s Long-Term Energy Plan. For example, a decision to issue a licence to prepare for the new units at the Darlington station was announced in August 2012, and one of the most complex engineering challenges in Ontario’s history of infrastructure is coming to a successful conclusion as workers at Bruce Power prepare to return Units 1 and 2 to commercial service.

The Canadian nuclear industry provides a broad spectrum of products and services that benefit Canadians, generating approximately $6.6 billion per year and contributing $1.5 billion in tax revenue and $1.2 billion in export revenues, and supports over 71,000 direct and indirect jobs.

Background:

Candu Energy statement on decision to close Gentilly-2 nuclear facility in Quebec (October 3) 

Hydro-Québec Confirms Gentilly-2 Closure at the End of 2012 (October 3)

Messages

Heather Kleb New CNA Vice President

Heather Kleb, CNA Vice President

If you know the Canadian Nuclear Association’s work in regulatory affairs then you’re probably familiar with Heather Kleb, our Director of Regulatory Affairs.

Today we have a very important announcement which reflects the ongoing evolution of the CNA.

As of October 1st, Heather Kleb has been promoted to the role of Vice President!

Throughout her time as the CNA Director of Regulatory Affairs, Heather’s high caliber work, leadership, and commitment to advocating on behalf of CNA member interests has established her suitability for this senior role.

She consistently demonstrates a high level of professionalism and commitment to the CNA and our members.

Please join us in congratulating Heather on her promotion to Vice President.

Nuclear Education Nuclear Outreach

Taking the Grocery Store Conversation Online

Last Wednesday, I was invited to speak to a group of Women-in-Nuclear (WiN) members from the Eastern-Ontario chapter at AECL in Chalk River. We got together to “talk nuclear,” but more specifically, how to talk nuclear on social media.

With the WiN Eastern Chapter Executives. L to R: Bev Kidd, Laura Allardyce (me), Solly Karivelil, and Anne Giardini

There is a lot of interest in social media among members of the nuclear industry, among people who are enthusiastic about the work they do, the technology they support, and the communities in which they live and do this impassioned work. There is a lot of pride in Canada’s nuclear industry – pride in our home grown, low-carbon CANDU technology, in the development of nuclear medicine technologies for diagnostic and therapeutic cancer treatments, and in how safe our operations are every day and for the last 50+ years. We want to share our stories with the rest of Canada and the world.

Social media is people having conversations online. It’s the same as meeting your neighbor in the grocery store and chatting about your day. The only difference is, it’s a bigger grocery store and you’re bumping into more neighbors. The stories you tell online are the same ones you would tell your neighbors.

We shouldn’t be afraid to show our pride online, to share interesting information on Facebook, to tweet a link to a good news story on Twitter, or to tell our own story on a blog.

As the keeper of the community (I maintain the TalkNUclear channels on Facebook, Twitter, this blog, etc), I have a lot of discussions about using social media strategically. I think this can sometimes get us confused about what the purpose of social media is, which is this: at the end of the day, social media is about relationships, not transactions. We are not talking to Canadians to get them to buy more nuclear, we’re not selling a product. What we are doing is talking to Canadians about the mutually beneficial relationship we’re engaged in. Our industry produces low-carbon energy, medical technologies, food and materials safety advancements – all of these things that benefits Canadians every day. Our social media strategy is just to talk to Canadians about these incredible benefits, just like we all do when we run into our neighbors at the grocery store.

A good place to start is with us. There are so many ways to “Talk Nuclear”