Monthly Archives: November 2012

Movember Nuclear Pride

Team NUvember Network Raises Over $53,000 for Movember!

This year, for the first time, the CNA got involved in Movember, an international annual fundraiser that raises awareness and funds for prostate cancer research, men’s health issues in general and mental health.

But it wasn’t enough for just the CNA to participate; we wanted to get our nuclear industry family on board too, so we set up Team NUvember.

The Team NUvember network connected 354 individuals across the Canadian nuclear industry from 14 separate fundraising teams across CNA member companies. Our friends at Cameco, Bruce Power, Ontario Power Generation, and Tetra Tech, plus professional organizations and academic institutions participated as growers or supporters.

Collectively, this network of NUvember fundraisers raised over $53,000 as of November 30th. We had a lot of fun tracking our Mo’gress and doing something in support of a cause so close to our industry.

Thank you to all our Mo’bros and Mo’sistas for participating and supporting! See you next year.

Happy Movember from CNA!
Final Mo’gress Picture
The $46k figure was out of date by the time we took the picture. Over $53,000 raised by the Team NUvember network!
Guest Blog Nuclear Outreach Nuclear Pride

NA-YGN Chalk River Chapter Hosts International Networking Event

Below is a guest blog from our friends at NA-YGN’s Chalk River Chapter. They recently put on a very successful professional networking event that included delegates from Canadian and American chapters and offered the opportunity to learn more about the activities at Chalk River Labs and network with their peers. Please read on for a fulsome summary.

On November 8th and 9th the North American Young Generation in Nuclear (NA-YGN) Chalk River Chapter and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) hosted 50 delegates from Canadian and American Chapters, originating from several different nuclear sites throughout North America for the inaugural professional networking event: Past, Present and Future in Nuclear.  Overall, the event was a great success and provided delegates with a significant opportunity to learn about the varied research projects currently ongoing at Chalk River and network with peers from other nuclear stations throughout the continent.

Attendees at NA-YGN’s professional networking event

The event kicked off Thursday evening with the Past section, where Joan Miller welcomed the delegates on behalf of AECL as NAYGN’s Executive Sponsor.  Morgan Brown, as the keynote speaker, then gave an entertaining and informative seminar on the history of nuclear science and technology in Canada and, specifically, Chalk River’s role in shaping and development of the Canadian nuclear industry.  The talk touched briefly on the role of the CANDU nuclear reactors in Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick and their respective energy distribution grids, and proceeded to lead into the historical reasons why Canada went with a heavy water reactor design.

Delegates were treated to a tour of Chalk River Laboratories.

A tour of Chalk River Laboratories on Friday November 9th was the main focal point of the event – showcasing the Present State of the Nuclear Industry in Canada.  The delegates experienced several aspects of the Laboratories, showcasing the numerous different areas of current nuclear research and development with several industry and academic partners.  Some of the areas showcased included mechanical systems design, nuclear non-proliferation detection equipment, the effects of radiation on biological systems, and the chemical production of hydrogen.  The driving focus behind these tours was to increase the awareness of the important role AECL and Chalk River serves to the Canadian nuclear industry in our partners throughout the industry.

Friday evening served complete the event, with a panel discussion focused on the Future State of the Nuclear Industry in Canada.  Executives from AECL, the Canadian Nuclear Association, and the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, were in attendance to provide insight into the future role of nuclear technology in supplying baseload electricity, the future of small modular reactors in the Canadian North, as well as the focus of future public outreach activities and what could be done to increase positive public perception of nuclear technology.  The initial series of questions asked to panel members and the ensuing discussions were quite insightful, with an excellent opportunity provided for delegates to ask questions related to future of the industry following.

Executives from AECL, the Canadian Nuclear Association, and the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission participated in a panel on the future role of nuclear.

Overall, the inaugural NAYGN Past, Present and Future of Nuclear event was a great success …

Guest Blog Nuclear Energy

Open Letter from Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission President Michael Binder

This letter by CNSC President, Dr. Michael Binder, is simply too good not to share. Kudos to the CNSC for being such a strong regulator and our member companies Cameco and AREVA for their solid safety track record and impeccable operations. Please read on below.

November 22, 2012

Following the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission’s (CNSC) recent decision to license a uranium exploration project in Quebec, I’m dismayed that recent statements and discussions over the safety of uranium mining have been based neither on fact nor science. Uranium mining and milling in this country is tightly regulated by the CNSC. Canada is a world leader in responsibly developing this resource. This is largely attributable to a solid safety track record.

Uranium mining is the only type of mining that has a dedicated federal regulator that oversees all aspects of operation on an ongoing basis. Provincial oversight is also strictly applied. In fact, uranium mining is the most regulated, monitored and understood type of mining in Canada.

Activists, medical practitioners and politicians who have demanded moratoriums may have various reasons for doing so, but their claims that the public and environment are at risk are fundamentally wrong. The provincial governments that have decided to ban uranium exploration have done so ignoring years of evidence-based scientific research on this industry.

The CNSC would never compromise safety by issuing a licence or allowing a uranium mine or mill to operate if it were not safe to do so. All monitoring data shows that uranium mining is as safe as other conventional metal mining in Canada.

The numbers speak for themselves. Metal mining effluent data reported to Environment Canada demonstrates that uranium mining operations from 2007 to 2010 was 100% compliant with federal release limits for all seven types of contaminants. Uranium mining operations were the only type of metal mine to have 100% compliance during this period.

Both the CNSC and provincial environmental regulators closely monitor and analyze industry releases to ensure streams, lakes and rivers downstream of mining operations are safe for people, animals, fish and plants.

We also monitor miner safety. The average annual radiation dose to miners is well below the CNSC annual dose limits, which are conservatively established to protect workers. Radiation doses to the public and the environment near uranium mines are negligible.

In Saskatchewan, where Canada’s operating uranium mines are found, the province’s Ministry of Labour Relations and Workplace Safety monitors all conventional health and safety issues for uranium mining. All reporting continuously shows that uranium mining and milling sites are among the best performing facilities in accident prevention and lost-time incidents across the province’s entire mining and industrial sectors.

The CNSC has carried out and validated numerous studies over the decades that have repeatedly provided sound evidence that workers and residents near these facilities are as healthy as the rest of the general population. The same is true of people who live near nuclear power plants.

The CNSC’s conclusions on the uranium mining industry are clearly based on decades of studies, research, and a rigorous licencing and inspection framework. That being said, it needs to be voiced again, the CNSC will never compromise safety and would never issue a licence for a mining or milling operation unless the proposed activities were safe.

I invite Canadians to visit our Web site to get the facts about uranium mining and the complete nuclear sector in Canada.

Michael Binder
President
Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

CNA Responds Nuclear Energy Nuclear Pride

NB Power Point Lepreau Generating Station Resumes Commercial Operations

The Canadian Nuclear Association (CNA) congratulates NB Power on the return to commercial service of its Point Lepreau Generating Station. The completion of this refurbishment project means an additional 25-30 years of continued safe, reliable, clean air energy for New Brunswick and surrounding export customers.

“The completed refurbishment and return to commercial operations of the Point Lepreau Generating Station is a great accomplishment,” says Heather Kleb, Interim President and CEO of the Canadian Nuclear Association. “Point Lepreau is an essential part of New Brunswick’s long-term energy policy and will help ensure the province achieves its goal of having 75 per cent of its electricity coming from clean, low-carbon sources by 2020.”

Point Lepreau is a foundational piece of NB Power’s domestic energy supply and export sales, and provides rate stability. The refurbishment of the Point Lepreau Generating Station positions NB Power once again as a utility with a world-class nuclear facility and the highly skilled work force required to operate it.

The Canadian nuclear industry supports the employment of 30,000 Canadians who are responsible for generating electricity, mining uranium, advancing nuclear medicine, and promoting Canada’s global leadership in science and technology innovation. Through these efforts, we also support 30,000 spin-off jobs and contribute to Canada’s supply of reliable, affordable power.

Background:

NB Power declares the Point Lepreau Generating Station commercially operational.

CNA2013

CNA2013 – Only One Week Remaining for Early Bird Prices!

Only one week remaining for Early Bird prices!

Register before December 1, 2012 to save big with Early Bird discounts!

Explore the CNA2013 site to discover what we have planned for you. Learn what this year’s Talking Nuclear: Dialogue in Action theme is about, view the preliminary Program, check out many of our confirmed speakers, and see who has already jumped on board as Sponsors of this world-class nuclear industry event!

100 students from across the country are applying to be there NOW!

Students from across the country are pouring in their applications to come to CNA2013. We’ve received great essays on Understanding Radiation, The Next 10 Years in Nuclear, Supporting Nuclear R&D, and more! Want to recruit these budding nuclear stars? Register today!

Check the CNA2013 site for updates as the program evolves.

Don’t miss your chance to save big with Early Bird registration. Register before December 1.

See you there! 

Canadian Nuclear Association
2013 Conference and Trade Show
February 27 – March 1, 2013
Westin Hotel, Ottawa, ON 

Guest Blog Nuclear Energy

Bringing Bruce A Back to Life has Transformed Ontario’s Energy Sector

This morning, the following article appeared in the Windsor Star, which contained a series of factual inaccuracies.

Our friends at Bruce Power wrote this letter to the editor to clear things up.

—-
To the Editor:

I would like to set the record straight on an article that was published in the Windsor Star this morning that contained a series of factual inaccuracies on the role nuclear power generation plays in Ontario.

Nuclear power provides half of Ontario’s electricity every day – that’s one out of two homes, car plants, businesses and schools. At Bruce Power, we provide a reliable source of low-cost electricity that is a major contributor to not only keeping the lights on, but getting the province off coal by the end of 2014.

The article states, “It took 15 years to complete the refurbishment,” of Bruce A’s Units 1 and 2. This is not correct. When these units were taken out of service in the 1990s there were no plans to bring them back to service until Bruce Power assumed control of the site in 2001. We immediately returned Units 3 and 4 to service by 2004 and then, in late-2005, launched something that had never been done before – the full refurbishment of two nuclear units. All of this was done by private investment in these publically owned assets.

Bringing Bruce A back to life has transformed Ontario’s energy sector with a large supply of low-cost, clean electricity.

Following Units 1 and 2 being removed from service in 1995 and 1997, combined with Units 3 and 4 in 1998, fossil generation dramatically increased in Ontario – it jumped from 12 per cent of electricity in 1995 to 29 per cent in 2000. With these units now back in service, we can move forward with a clean energy future and support the phase-out of coal by the end of 2014.

The economic analysis in the article is also inaccurate. There is no doubt the economics of energy involves many elements, but there is only one thing that matters to consumers – how much they pay for electricity. The Bruce Power site supplies low-cost electricity for Ontario ratepayers and we are undisputedly lower than the other supply options raised in the article. In fact, the price consumers pay for Bruce A output is 6.8 cents per kilowatt-hour, which is significantly lower than solar at 44 and 80 cents, depending on the type of project. This information is available on the Ontario Power Authority’s website.

We appreciate the opportunity to correct the record. For more information visit www.brucepower.com.

James Scongack
Vice-President, Corporate Affairs
Bruce Power