Author Archives: Erin Polka

CNA Has a New Key Messages App!

The CNA has a new key messages app and it’s a significant improvement over the previous version.

The free, user-friendly app features key messages around popular nuclear-related topics, along with well-documented proof-points.

This new version was developed internally so that the CNA has complete control over the look and functionality. Changes and additions can also be easily managed this way.

Originally designed with CNA members in mind, this app can be used by anyone to explain and justify the use of nuclear technology in Canada and worldwide.

The app can be accessed by searching in the App Store (iPhone) or Google Play (Android) using appropriate keywords or by following these links:

We are very excited about this new digital addition to our collateral, and encourage you to share the news with friends and colleagues.

CNA response to “The security of Ontario’s nuclear plants should be an election priority, not the salaries of top Hydro One execs”

The op-ed “The security of Ontario’s nuclear plants should be an election priority, not the salaries of top Hydro One execs” (The London Free Press, May 4) exaggerates the risks posed by nuclear energy.

The probability of a Fukushima-like event in Ontario is extremely low. Despite this, following Fukushima, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission inspected Canada’s nuclear power plants and revised standards to improve reactor defense and emergency response. Changes to regulation and licensing were also made to ensure better disaster preparedness and mitigation.

The CNSC’s Fukushima Task Force Report stated that the tsunami risk at the Darlington, Pickering, and Bruce Power generating stations is very low, given their location on the Great Lakes. The geological stability of the underlying Canadian Shield also minimizes the risk of earthquakes and tsunamis.

As for cyberattacks on nuclear power facilities, there is no risk to the operations of nuclear power plants because the reactors and control rooms are not connected to the Internet. Nuclear power plants are some of the best protected infrastructure systems. They are designed to be disconnected from the Internet and other networks, preventing hackers from accessing plant operations or safety systems

Globally, the nuclear industry has a strong safety culture of continuous improvement. Safety is always the No. 1 priority.  And nuclear ranked as the safest source of power in a 2012 Forbes report based on fatalities per kWh.

John Barrett
President and CEO
Canadian Nuclear Association
Ottawa, ON

CNA response to “Nuclear energy isn’t ‘clean'”

Re: Nuclear energy isn’t ‘clean’ (Winnipeg Free Press, April 25)

Dave Taylor’s opinion piece declaring nuclear neither clean nor the future ignores the reality of decarbonization at the national and global level.

In April of 2014, the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recommended tripling the amount of energy use from renewable energy and nuclear power to keep climate change within two degrees Celsius.

The International Energy Agency in their 2016 World Energy Outlook predicted a requirement for global nuclear generation to increase by almost two and a half times by 2040.

Canada’s nuclear reactor technology and uranium exports have, over the last 30 years, contributed globally to the avoidance of at least a billion tonnes of CO2 (in displacing fossil fuel sources) – a unique and ongoing contribution to global climate change mitigation which no other Canadian energy source can claim.

Globally, nuclear power is on the upswing. According to the World Nuclear Association, there are 60 nuclear reactors currently under construction worldwide, with another 157 on order or planned, and 351 that have been proposed.

Unlike some other sources of energy, nuclear does not release its waste into the atmosphere. Spent fuel is safely stored and relies on sound science and technology. Through the Nuclear Waste Management Organization, Canada has a plan for the safe, long-term management of used nuclear fuel that is fully funded by nuclear operators in Canada.

Finally, contrary to Taylor’s statement regarding the futility of Canada’s reactor sales, it should be noted that Canada has actually sold 12 CANDU reactors to China, India, Romania, Argentina and South Korea.

John Barrett
President and CEO
Canadian Nuclear Association

CNS Call for Papers

The Conference
The Canadian Nuclear Society will be holding its 8th International Conference on Simulation Methods in Nuclear Science and Engineering in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, October 9-11, 2018 (Tue -Thu).

Objective of the Conference
The objective of the Conference is to provide an international forum for discussion and exchange of information, results and views amongst scientists and engineers working in the various fields of nuclear science and engineering.

Topics of interest
The scope of the Conference covers all aspects of nuclear science and engineering, modelling and simulation, including, but not limited to:

  • Reactor Physics
  • Thermalhydraulics
  • Safety Analysis
  • Fuel and Fuel Channel Analysis
  • Computer Codes and Modelling
  • Verification &Validation of Computer Codes
  • Best-Estimate and Probabilistic Safety Analysis
  • Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis
  • Monte Carlo and its Applications
  • Operation Support
  • Simulation for Fusion Energy Applications
  • Advanced Reactors & Advanced Fuel Cycles
  • Irradiated-Fuel, Proliferation Resistance
  • Plant Refurbishment and Commissioning

Courses, Workshops and Tours (preliminary):
Tour to Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (Fri 12) Workshops on DRAGON and SERPENT (Tue 9)

Important dates and deadlines
Full-paper submission: 2018 May 1
Notification of acceptance: 2018 July 1
Final paper submission: 2018 September 1

Local Organising Committee
Executive Chair: Adriaan Buijs, McMaster University
Technical Program Chair: Eleodor Nichita, University of Ontario Institute of Technology
Plenary Program Chair: Wei Shen, CANDU Owners Group
Assistant Executive Chair: Ben Rouben, 12&1 Consulting
Treasurer: Mohamed Younis, Retired (formerly AECL)

Conference Secretariat (All Inquiries):
CNS Office: cns-snc@on.aibn.com
Tel.: +1 416-977-7620

Guidelines for Submission of Papers:
Submissions should present facts that are new and significant or represent a state-of-the-art review.
Submit full papers to: https://www.softconf.com/h/8icsmnse.
The template can be found here and on the conference website.

For more information please visit: http://cns-snc.ca/events/8icsmnse/

Low Carbon, Clean Energy: Making Communities Healthier

According to the U.S Energy Department’s latest International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO), worldwide energy consumption will increase by almost 50 percent by 2040. Meeting global demand will require growing the renewable and nuclear power industries.

The IEA forecasts that worldwide nuclear power, which currently offsets an estimated 2.5 billion tons of CO2 emissions yearly, will slightly increase in its contribution to the global electricity grid. The forecasted 2 percent increase is not nearly enough. If countries like Canada are to meet COP21 targets and improve the health of our environment we need more nuclear.

Information confirmed in the latest IEO report found “even though non fossil fuels are expected to grow faster than fossil fuels (petroleum and other liquid fuels, natural gas and coal), fossil fuels will still account for more than three-quarters of world energy consumption through 2040.”

health2An extreme shift in weather patterns brought about by greenhouse gas emissions  has resulted in more heat and flooding, increasing the amount of ground-level ozone, carbon dioxide and particulates – all of which have negative health consequences

The climate change price tag for Canada’s healthcare industry is a hefty one. Data released by the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) found that by 2031 air pollution related illnesses, including lost productivity and ER admissions could cost Canadian taxpayers close to $250 billion.

The projected ongoing use of fossil fuels is a concern both for meeting climate targets and for improving air quality which are critical components to improving overall health. In a 2014 news release, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported “in 2012 around 7 million people died – one in eight of total global deaths – as a result of air pollution exposure. This finding more than doubles previous estimates and confirms that air pollution is now the world’s largest single environmental health risk. Reducing air pollution could save millions of lives.”

In Canada, the rates of Severe Asthma are rising, due in part to climate change. Over a quarter-million Canadians live with severe asthma.  Furthermore, allergies can be triggered by mold related to flooding and by increased pollen production from distressed plants.

“People with severe asthma may struggle to breathe even when they are taking their prescribed medication,” states Vanessa Foran, President and CEO of the Asthma Society of Canada.  “Environmental allergens are the primary triggers for 60-80 % of Canadians living with asthma,” she says.

Continuing to invest in low-carbon energy sources is an important step in improving air quality. The year 2000 saw a peak for coal-fired electricity generation in Ontario, with almost 50 million tons of GHG emissions being released into the environment. Fifteen years later, nuclear energy accounted for the majority of electricity generation – 66.5%, displacing over 90% of emissions, thereby cleaning the air and improving the health of Ontarians.

As Canada’s largest province moves forward in developing its next Long-Term Energy Plan, which has a key focus on clean, reliable energy, it is clear that nuclear must be at the forefront of discussions.

A safe and reliable energy source that contributes to climate commitments, nuclear power can help to improve the health of people around the world while meeting an increased global demand for energy.

Discover Your Inner Leader with Drew Dudley at CNA2017

Wake up bright and early on Friday, February 24, to hear from CNA2017 breakfast keynote speaker Drew Dudley.

Drew is a leadership educator who believes “leadership is not a characteristic reserved for the extraordinary.” Over the years he has worked to help people discover the leader within themselves.

Drew’s interest in developing people’s leadership began when he was the Leadership Development Coordinator at the University of Toronto. In 2010 he founded Nuance Leadership Development Services, a company that creates leadership curricula for communities, organizations and individuals. That same year Drew gave a TED Talk in which he called on all of us to “celebrate leadership as the everyday act of improving each other’s lives.”

For more information about CNA2017 visit cna.ca/2017-conference.