Category Archives: CNA2017

CNA2017

Deep Geologic Repository: A Matter Of Science

April 3rd, 2017
By: Dr. John Barrett
President & Chief Executive Officer
Canadian Nuclear Association

The recent CTV W5 segment on Ontario Power Generation’s proposed Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) in Kincardine, Ontario, left the impression that some opponents viewed the location of the project as a simple act of convenience.

It is not a matter of convenience but a matter of science.

The DGR project intends to store low- and intermediate-level nuclear waste deep underground. In public consultations regarding the DGR, and again in the W5 segment, there is a suggestion that OPG chose the Kincardine site for its convenience, while ignoring concerns that radioactive material might seep through the rock and contaminate Lake Huron.

This flies directly in the face of the 2015 report of the federal Joint Review Panel, which held more than 33 days of public hearings and reviews more than 12,500 pages of evidence. The Panel’s Environmental Assessment called the geology of the area “highly suitable.”

Here’s why.

The host rock under the Kincardine site is four times the strength of concrete, and it would take 1 million years for one molecule of water to pass one metre in this rock.

The rock was formed more than 450 million years ago. It has remained intact despite two mountain formations and nine ice ages. Above the host rock rests 200 metres of impermeable shale.

Taken together, the rocks of this unique formation provide a natural barrier that scientists from around the world agree is perfect for permanently and safely isolating waste.

While W5 painted a picture of a “town divided,” this is actually not accurate.

The DGR actually has broad community acceptance. The Municipality of Kincardine reaffirmed its support for the project as recently as this past February via a resolution passed by the municipal council. Similar expressions of support for the DGR were also passed by Bruce County, which comprises 8 municipalities, including Kincardine, and by Huron-Kinloss and Saugeen Shores.

Much of the low- and intermediate-level waste that DGR will store currently sits above ground at OPG’s Western Waste Management Facility, located at the Bruce Power site at Kincardine. Is keeping it there indefinitely the better choice?

The answer finds its roots in moral responsibility and in evidence-based science.

Since our generation benefitted from the use of nuclear-generated electricity, we also bear responsibility for the waste. Responsibility rests with us, not our grandchildren.
The DGR is based on rigorous science, not “convenience”. It is planned in ideal geology, with world-leading engineering. The federal Joint Review Panel reports states the DGR will perform its job for 1,000,000 years.

The Deep Geologic Repository provides a way to manage our responsibility safely and securely. It will be a lasting solution for the waste, ensuring peace of mind.

CNA2017

ONTARIO’S NUCLEAR ADVANTAGE: LOW-COST ELECTRICITY, JOBS & GROWTH; HEALTH & CLEAN AIR

Ontario has a nuclear advantage. Yet many in the province don’t realize it or how much it benefits them and their everyday lives
When we flick on the lights, turn on the computer, or charge electric vehicles, we give no thought to how our electricity is produced. We should take comfort in knowing that nuclear power is the backbone of Ontario’s electricity system.

Nuclear power provides families and businesses with a low-cost, safe, reliable source of electricity, and it makes our Energy Star appliances even cleaner when they run on low GHG-emitting Nuclear. For those who like solid facts: Ontario’s nuclear plants supply over 13,000 MW of clean power – or, about 60% of Ontarians’ needs every day of the week, every week of the year. What’s more, as Ontario’s electricity demand increases, with people turning to electric vehicles and the province growing in population and economic activity, nuclear power can expand to ensure our electricity stays clean.

When we think of the challenges of climate change, and the need for carbon-pricing, we do not automatically realize that nuclear power is virtually GHG-emissions-free. The clean electricity from nuclear generation is not impacted by cap-and-trade costs.

When we urge our governments to do something about the effects of climate change, we don’t always grasp that Ontario’s ability to end coal-fired generation was largely made possible by the return to service of two Bruce Power reactors, and the return to commercial operation of units 1 and 4 at Pickering.
The clean, smog-free air in parts of southern Ontario is a blessing to those with asthma or breathing problems. Today, Ontario has over 90% of its electricity powered by clean energy sources. Nuclear shoulders 2/3rds of that.

When we think of concerns about hydro bills, we often tend to lump all generation sources together. We assume they’re all equally to blame for producing expensive electricity. But that’s not the fact. Nuclear generation in Ontario is currently paid 6.6 cents/kWh compared to the average residential price of 11 cents/kWh, according to the Ontario Energy Board. And the power that’s bought by Ontarian consumers is reliable, not intermittent, and not dependent on the fluctuations of weather. Thankfully.

When we think of friends and family who have undergone treatment for cancer and when we assume that the medical equipment used around them is safely sterilized, we don’t say thank goodness for nuclear reactors. But we should. The reactors at Bruce Power and OPG’s Pickering plant produce 70% of the world’s Cobalt-60, used to attack cancer cells. Cobalt-60 is also used to sterilize gowns, gloves, implantable devices and syringes in hospitals in Ontario and around the world. What other energy sources treat cancer and save lives? Nuclear does.

When we think of high-tech, good-paying jobs for our families and children, we seldom look first to Ontario’s nuclear industry. But do Ontarians realize how many jobs are supported by the nuclear industry and how much communities benefit from having companies in the nuclear supply chain? The nuclear industry in Canada contributes over $6 billion annually to the economy and supports 60,000 direct and indirect jobs. Many of these are in Ontario, and they stay in Ontario because of the expertise and high-quality manufacturing and engineering skills required by the industry.

When it comes to innovation in advanced energy technologies, you only have to cite the potential of small modular reactors (SMRs) or the next generation of inherently safe reactors that recycle fuel to feel the excitement among the younger generation of scientists, engineers, environmentalists. They see increasingly what new innovations in nuclear can do to bring reliable, safe, emissions-free energy – in the quantities needed – to an energy-hungry world desperately wanting more. They will be the generation to deliver this extraordinary benefit to humanity.
Take all of these and add them up. What you get is Ontario’s incredible nuclear advantage. Time to recognize this and capitalize on it. Nuclear provides solutions to the pressing needs of today and tomorrow. Time to think afresh about nuclear and its contribution to growth, to the environment, to an innovative, clean energy future.

An opportunity for such thinking is the Ontario Government’s forthcoming Long-Term Energy Plan. This is where Ontario’s nuclear advantage is established, underpinned and presented imaginatively for the future.

For our part, the Canadian Nuclear Association (CNA) is proud to launch a new website that promotes fact-based awareness and understanding of Canada’s nuclear success story: www.ontariosnuclearadvantage.com Ontario’s world-class nuclear sector is something of which Ontarians and all Canadians should be proud.

CNA2017

Discover Your Inner Leader with Drew Dudley at CNA2017

Wake up bright and early on Friday, February 24, to hear from CNA2017 breakfast keynote speaker Drew Dudley.

Drew is a leadership educator who believes “leadership is not a characteristic reserved for the extraordinary.” Over the years he has worked to help people discover the leader within themselves.

Drew’s interest in developing people’s leadership began when he was the Leadership Development Coordinator at the University of Toronto. In 2010 he founded Nuance Leadership Development Services, a company that creates leadership curricula for communities, organizations and individuals. That same year Drew gave a TED Talk in which he called on all of us to “celebrate leadership as the everyday act of improving each other’s lives.”

For more information about CNA2017 visit cna.ca/2017-conference.

CNA2017

Op-Ed: Ontario’s Long-Term Energy Plan: Why Pickering Matters

Ontarians and their government are completing a review of the province’s Long-Term Energy Plan (LTEP) to guide energy decision-making over the next three years to 2019. As anticipated in the previous LTEP (2013-16), the government of Ontario announced in December 2015 plans for the refurbishment of 10 power reactors at the Darlington and Bruce Nuclear Generating… read more »

CNA2017

CNA2017 Welcomes Laura Dawson as Keynote

CNA2017 is excited to welcome Laura Dawson to the stage as its lunch keynote speaker on Thursday, February 23.

Laura is the Director of the Canada Institute. Named one of Canada’s Top 100 foreign policy influencers by the Hill Times in 2014, Laura is a speaker, writer, and thought leader on Canada-U.S., NAFTA, TPP, and international trade issues. Previously, she served as the senior advisor on economic affairs at the United States Embassy in Ottawa and taught international trade and Canada-U.S. relations at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs. Laura continues to serve as Emeritus Advisor at Dawson Strategic, which provides advice to business on cross-border trade, market access and regulatory issues. She is a Fellow at the Canadian Defence & Foreign Affairs Institute and serves on the board of the Council of the Great Lakes Region.

For more information about CNA2017 visit cna.ca/2017-conference.

CNA2017

CNA2017 Panel: Clean Tech and Power Politics

On Thursday, February 23, at 4:00pm, Joel-Denis Bellavance, Susan Delacourt and Timothy Powers will gather onstage at CNA2017 to discuss clean technology and power politics.

Joel-Denis Bellavance is the Ottawa bureau chief for La Presse. He has worked for the French-language newspaper since 2003 and has been reporting on the Hill for over 22 years. In June of 2016, Joel-Denis received the prestigious Charles-Lynch award, which each year recognizes a parliamentarian journalist for their professional accomplishments.

Susan Delacourt is a senior writer at the Toronto Star. Previously she was the senior political writer at the National Post, a columnist and feature writer at the Ottawa Citizen, and a parliamentary correspondent at the Globe and Mail. She received the Charles-Lynch award in 2011, was named one of “The Top 100 Most Influential People in Government and Politics” by the Hill Times in 2012, and has published four book on Canadian politics.

Timothy (Tim) Powers is the Vice-Chairman of Summa Strategies. Tim has served as an advisor to a national party leader and federal cabinet ministers, was an aboriginal affairs negotiator for the federal government, acted as a private consultant to groups involved in the Voisey’s Bay development, and has written extensively on the Innu of Davis Inlet, Labrador.

For more information about CNA2017 visit cna.ca/2017-conference.