Category Archives: Nuclear Pride

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Cameco Named One of Canada’s Best Diversity Employers for 2014

By Romeo St-Martin
Digital Media Officer
Canadian Nuclear Association

Congratulations to Cameco.

For the fifth successive year, Cameco has been selected by the Globe and Mail as one of Canada’s Best Diversity Employers for 2014.

The annual competition recognizes Canadian employers that have exceptional workplace diversity and inclusiveness programs.

“This award recognizes our long-standing track record in aboriginal and Métis employment,” said Tim Gitzel, Cameco’s president and CEO. “We are proud to be Canada’s leading industrial employer of aboriginal people and of the proactive approach we take to support career growth in this sector of our workforce.”

Here are some of the reasons why Cameco was recognized by the Globe:

  • Established a northern workforce strategy to focus on the recruitment of residents from northern Saskatchewan, of which a large percentage are Aboriginal – the strategy is managed by a dedicated team of employees who consult with Aboriginal leaders, local schools, community members and professionals on the creation of opportunities for residents as well as overall development of the northern community

Those of us in Canada’s nuclear industry already know it’s a great place to work, offering long-lasting, safe, well-trained and high-knowledge jobs to tens of thousands of Canadians. Cameco continues to set a great example that all Canadian businesses can admire and follow.

Nuclear Energy Nuclear Pride Nuclear R&D Nuclear Safety

What Kind of Environmentalist Endorses Nuclear? An Informed and Realistic One.

There’s an interesting article on Slate.com today called The Pro-Nukes Environmental Movement: After Fukushima, is nuclear energy still the best way to fight climate change?

The article says what we’ve been saying for a while: that while renewable energy sources such as wind and solar are part of a clean energy mix, they simply can’t meet the world’s growing energy demands in the next few decades without some unforeseen leap forward in grid-scale energy storage. When the wind isn’t blowing, when the sun isn’t shining, and when you don’t have a way to efficiently store huge amounts of power, where does the power come from? Unfortunately in many circumstances, that need is filled by burning fossil fuels like coal and gas.

Nuclear’s reliable base load power, combined with advances in electrifying our transportation systems, is the cleanest way to get off fossil fuels that are, as this article says, cooking the planet.

But the article does raise some concerns – the same concerns that are always raised when talking about nuclear power: capital cost and waste. It also mentions the nuclear renaissance, which, before Fukushima, was underway as the world was recognizing the opportunity for nuclear to help us quit coal and reduce emissions.

The article concludes by talking about “next generation” technology: reactors that are able to efficiently burn the used-fuel and include even more redundant safe guards (our backups have backups).

I asked our policy director, John Stewart, to touch on the cost issue and explain a bit about next generation technology: How far away is it and what’s the hold up?

Well, first, let’s point out that “current generation” nuclear power is already very good – especially when you’re looking at the carbon issue.  A technology with zero carbon emissions in today’s operation is still going to be at zero in its next generation.  If it’s carbon you’re concerned about, today’s nuclear technology is unbeatable. I’m abstracting, of course, from marginal improvements in the way we build or refuel the plants – we can use cleaner trucks to deliver the uranium fuel to the plant, or lower-carbon concrete technologies when we pour the foundation, but that’s about it.

The reactor “generations” you’re talking about is a classification system developed by the US Department of Energy and described in detail at www.energy.gov.  Reactor technology has been advancing just like technology in many other areas over the past three decades.  In cars or phones or computers, we’ve all been aware of those advances because everyone buys the results.  In nuclear, reactors are advancing but virtually nobody in North America has been buying the results.  The reactors we see are mostly older technology, dating back often to the seventies and eighties.  They work just fine, they’re safe, they’re clean, they’re very economical, but they do not reflect the state of the art, which is mostly being bought and built in places like China and India – or will be over the coming decade or two.

So the short answer about next generation technology is it’s not far away, and the hold up is just demand.  Regulatory processes aside, advanced reactor technology is available – it’s largely a matter of building it.

DOE_ReactorGenerations

Source: http://nuclear.energy.gov/genIV/documents/gen_iv_roadmap.pdf

Conversations about cost have to be clear – are we talking about up-front capital investment, that is the plant construction cost, or are we talking about the average cost of generating a unit of power?  Nuclear’s record is very clear – it is one of the most affordable ways to get a unit of power in the long run.   It’s now selling for about six cents a kilowatt hour in Ontario, a real bargain especially considering how clean it is.  One of the main reasons is that the plants are so durable, lasting for fifty to sixty years.  When a capital asset is amortized over a period that long, capital costs can be very large and they still shrink in importance.  The unit cost of power over that six decades is very low. 

Nuclear Energy Nuclear Outreach Nuclear Pride

Groups Fighting Nuclear Energy and Advocating Industrial Wind and Solar are not Environmentalists!

This blog post by Rod Adams reminds me of the letter to the editor of the Hamilton Spec we wrote yesterday in response to an anti-nuclear attack by renewable energy lobbyists.

Some Environmentally Friendly Points About Nuclear:

  • Excluding hydroelectric, no other source of energy can produce so much clean, base load power at such sustained levels as nuclear.
  • Nuclear power is an integral part of the clean energy portfolio. Because nuclear power plants produce large amounts of continuous power, they enable the use of complementary renewable energy sources that are intermittent (such as wind and solar).
  • There are virtually no greenhouse gas emissions from our nuclear power plants so our industry does not contribute to climate change or smog.
  • Electricity currently generated by nuclear power facilities globally saves the potential emission of about 2.4 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases per year that would result from the same amount of electricity generated by fossil-based sources – equivalent to the emissions from all the cars in the Western Hemisphere..
  • The land footprint of a nuclear facility, such as Darlington (Canada’s second largest nuclear facility), is roughly the same as a shopping centre so it doesn’t disturb much of the surrounding environment compared with most other electricity sources.
ProNukeEnvironmentalist

I need to get another one of these mugs before the writing comes off completely.

Groups fighting nuclear energy and advocating industrial wind and solar are not environmentalists!

Rod Adams · January 8, 2013

I’m mad as hell and I don’t want to take it any more. Groups that fight any and all use of nuclear energy and also spend time advocating for the increased use of massive, industrial scale energy collectors on undeveloped, virgin land should NEVER be called “environmental groups”. I am not saying that the groups are full of bad people, I am saying that the “environmental” label is contradicted by the facts.

Read the whole post at Atomic Insights.

 

Nuclear Pride Uncategorized

A Look at the Women-in-Mining and -Nuclear Sask Networking Event

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Great turn out at the WiM/WiN Networking Event

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Member of WiM and WiN Saskatchewan get together to make connections and have fun.

Thanks to the Saskatchewan Geological Society (SGS), Women in Mining & Women in Nuclear Saskatchewan had a second successful networking event this year.  WIM/WiN-SK was recently launched in June of this year.  The SGS provided the room and advertising at the SGS annual conference.  More than 60 women attended the event which also saw an increase in memberships!  Thanks to all the sponsors who made the event so successful and to all the people who attended the event.

 

Nuclear Pride

WiN-Canada Profiles CNA Chief, Heather Kleb

Heather Kleb, VP, Canadian Nuclear Association

Women-in-Nuclear Canada does a great job of highlighting opportunities for, and raising the profile of, women in the nuclear industry. One way they do this is with the “Women of WiN” page on their website.

Visit the page to meet some of our industry’s interesting, skilled, talented, and amazing women. But wait, here’s one now!

WiN is profiling our interim President and CEO, Heather Kleb. Heather’s busy wearing two hats these days; she’s Acting President at CNA but also responsible for directing CNA regulatory affairs on behalf of all our industry members.

Learn about Heather at WinCanada.org or read on below.

Heather Kleb
Title: Vice President
Company: Canadian Nuclear Association

As Vice President at the Canadian Nuclear Association, Heather Kleb helps create a positive public, political, and regulatory environment for Canada’s nuclear industry. Heather started her career in the nuclear field as an environmental scientist nearly ten years ago.

In this role, she participated in regulatory hearings where she observed first-hand how public perceptions about nuclear energy can affect the industry and the communities where we operate. Now, in a senior role at the CNA, she has the opportunity to address these perceptions and promote the nuclear industry within Canada and abroad.

Before nuclear, Heather spent nearly a decade working in mining and other industries after completing her Masters in Science in Ecology at the University of Regina. During these early years, Heather was mentored by a female biologist who greatly influenced her career. It was this experience that motivated her to become involved with Women in Nuclear.

As a member of WiN, Heather is able to support the success of women within the industry and to further her career through interactions with other industry professionals.

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Happy Holidays from your CNA

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we didn’t think that one through.

FROM ALL OF US HERE AT CNA

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Holiday BONUS!


Click to view our Year In Review video on TalkNUclear.tv

 

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Click to download the Holiday edition of the NUze

Aussi disponible en français

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