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Setting the Record Straight on the Price of Electricity

By John Barrett
President and CEO
Canadian Nuclear Association

Environmental Defence has a new online campaign in which they are trying to pin the blame for Ontario’s electricity costs on nuclear, while at the same time ignoring nuclear’s role in helping Ontario’s landmark achievement of ending coal-fired electricity generation.

These alternative facts have been discredited by many, including the findings of Ontario’s Auditor General’s 2015 report on electric power system planning.

On electricity prices, the low cost of nuclear was recently highlighted in a news release from the Ontario Energy Board, which indicated nuclear accounted for only 38 per cent of the Global Adjustment while generating 59 per cent of the electricity.
In 2016, nuclear power generated 61% of Ontario’s electricity at well below the amounts paid to other generators. In fact, the average price of nuclear was 6.6 cents per kWh compared to the average residential price of 11 cents per kWh.

Wind and solar make up a small amount of Ontario’s electricity bill because they make up a small amount of Ontario’s electricity grid. Wind generated only six per cent of Ontario’s electricity in 2016 and solar less than one per cent. Despite this modest output, wind and solar nevertheless accounted for 26 per cent of the Global Adjustment.

There is a myth that, due to the capital investments required in nuclear power, the consequence is a high price of power. This simply isn’t true. That’s because nuclear facilities operate for decades and generate large volumes of electricity on a consistent basis. Ontario’s nuclear facilities have a demonstrated track-record of high reliability. That’s why the province is reinvesting in them now.

Environmental Defence has also failed to mention nuclear’s important role in Ontario’s phase-out of coal in 2014 and ending smog days across the province, suggesting it was new wind and solar alone that got the job done.

A fact check would show that between 2000 and 2013, nuclear-powered electrical generation rose 20 percent in Ontario, coinciding with a 27 percent drop in coal-fired electricity. During the same period, non-hydro renewables increased to 3.4 percent from one percent. This major transition to a cleaner Ontario could not have happened without nuclear.

During that period, Bruce Power doubled its fleet of operating reactors from four to eight, becoming the world’s largest nuclear generating station. While more renewable energy did come on line, Bruce Power estimates they provided 70% of the carbon free energy needed to replace the power from the shutdown of coal plants.

The long-term investment programs currently underway across Ontario’s nuclear fleet, including Pickering, Darlington and Bruce Power, will secure this low-cost source of electricity over the long-term, while meeting our needs today.

Nuclear-generated electricity was the right choice for Ontario decades ago. It remains the right choice today.

OPG and Bruce Power recognize the cost of electricity for Ontario families and businesses is an important issue across the Province. Both companies are committed to clean air and continuing to provide low cost electricity for Ontario homes and businesses in the short, medium and long-term.

CNA2017

CNA2017 Panel: Clean Tech and Power Politics

On Thursday, February 23, at 4:00pm, Joel-Denis Bellavance, Susan Delacourt and Timothy Powers will gather onstage at CNA2017 to discuss clean technology and power politics.

Joel-Denis Bellavance is the Ottawa bureau chief for La Presse. He has worked for the French-language newspaper since 2003 and has been reporting on the Hill for over 22 years. In June of 2016, Joel-Denis received the prestigious Charles-Lynch award, which each year recognizes a parliamentarian journalist for their professional accomplishments.

Susan Delacourt is a senior writer at the Toronto Star. Previously she was the senior political writer at the National Post, a columnist and feature writer at the Ottawa Citizen, and a parliamentary correspondent at the Globe and Mail. She received the Charles-Lynch award in 2011, was named one of “The Top 100 Most Influential People in Government and Politics” by the Hill Times in 2012, and has published four book on Canadian politics.

Timothy (Tim) Powers is the Vice-Chairman of Summa Strategies. Tim has served as an advisor to a national party leader and federal cabinet ministers, was an aboriginal affairs negotiator for the federal government, acted as a private consultant to groups involved in the Voisey’s Bay development, and has written extensively on the Innu of Davis Inlet, Labrador.

For more information about CNA2017 visit cna.ca/2017-conference.

Uncategorized

The CNS/CNA Honours and Awards Committee is Still Seeking Nominations

The deadline to submit nominations for the 2017 Canadian Nuclear Achievement Awards, jointly sponsored by the Canadian Nuclear Society (CNS) and the Canadian Nuclear Association (CNA), has been extended to February 3, 2017.

These Awards represent an opportunity to recognize individuals who have made significant contributions, technical and non-technical, to various aspects of nuclear science and technology in Canada. They will officially be presented during the CNS Annual Conference, held June 4 – 7, 2017 in Niagara Falls, Ontario.

Nominations may be submitted for any of the following Awards:

  • W. B. Lewis Medal
  • Ian McRae Award
  • Harold A. Smith Outstanding Contribution Award
  • Innovative Achievement Award
  • John S. Hewitt Team Achievement Award
  • Education and Communication Award
  • George C. Laurence Award for Nuclear Safety
  • Fellow of the Canadian Nuclear Society
  • R. E. Jervis Award

For detailed information on the nomination package, Awards criteria, and how to submit the nomination, see the linked brochure or visit: cns-snc.ca/cns/awards. The nomination package shall include a completed and signed nomination checklist.

If you have any additional questions, please do not hesitate to contact Ruxandra Dranga.

CNA2017

It’s Not Too Late to Register for a Workshop at CNA2017!

In addition to a full conference and trade show, the CNA is holding two separate workshops on Wednesday, February 22, from 1-4 pm.

Workshop #1: Public Affairs

Participants of the public affairs workshop will hear from Michele Austin, Senior Advisor at Summa Strategies, about how to communicate effectively with the Trudeau government and the Trump administration, as well as how to leverage the power of social media.

Following, participants will engage in government-style roundtable discussions around honing the Canadian nuclear industry’s key messaging on the issues of:

  • Climate change & the environment
  • Waste management & decommissioning
  • Safety & security
  • Innovation & new technology
  • Jobs & the economy

Workshop #2: Regulatory Affairs

Participants of the regulatory affairs workshop will hear from a range of guest speakers on the latest regulatory developments impacting the nuclear industry, including:

  • The Canadian Environmental Assessment Act
  • The Fisheries Act
  • The Navigable Waters Act
  • Regulatory framework updates by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC)

Adding a workshop to your CNA2017 registration is easy!

If you’ve already registered for CNA2017, locate your confirmation email (“CNA2017 Registration Confirmation”) and follow the link to edit your registration as seen in the image below.

If you haven’t already registered for CNA2017, this is your opportunity to kill two birds with one stone! Visit https://cna.ca/2017-conference/registration/ for pricing information and the registration form. Hurry, though, because late fees apply as of January 28!

CNA2017

Social Values and Energy Policy Panel at CNA2017

Join Monica Gattinger, Jatin Nathwani and Alan Young at CNA2017 as they debate social values and energy policy on Thursday, February 23, at 2pm.

Monica Gattinger is the Director of the University of Ottawa’s Institute for Science, Society and Policy (ISSP). She is an internationally sought-after speaker, author and researcher with extensive expertise in interdisciplinary research and teaching, notably in the areas of energy, culture, policy and governance.

Jatin Nathwani is the founding Executive Director of the Waterloo Institute for Sustainable Energy (WISE) and holds the prestigious Ontario Research Chair in Public Policy for Sustainable Energy at the University of Waterloo. He is also the Co-Director of the consortium “Affordable Energy for Humanity (AE4H): A Global Change Initiative” that comprises 130+ leading energy access researchers and practitioners from 30 institutions and 16 countries.

Alan Young is the Co-Director of the Materials Efficiency Research Group, which works with international governments, companies, First Nations and civil societies to develop effective strategies and strong governance. He is a facilitator, mediator, strategist and activist seeking to advance sustainable development concepts and initiatives.

For more information about CNA2017 visit cna.ca/2017-conference.

Uncategorized

The 2017 Canadian Nuclear Factbook is Available NOW!

The latest edition of the Canadian Nuclear Factbook is available now!

Published regularly since 2004, the Factbook has become a highly regarded reference on nuclear technology in Canada and around the world. Its distribution spans several countries, and we were thrilled that the 2015 edition reached over 25,000 individuals physically and thousands more online.

With the 2017 Factbook, we are building on our success with a sleek new look, colour-coded sections and rugged half-Canadian binding. The new edition also features additional information on nuclear refurbishment, uranium mining, radioactive waste and transportation.

Interested in ordering free copies? Simply email us at info@cna.ca! (Shipping charges may apply on international orders.)

You can also download a PDF version on the CNA website.