Tag Archives: Canadian Nuclear Association

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Top Five Takeaways from the 2019 Leadership Conference for Women in Energy

By Emily James, Communications Officer, Canadian Nuclear Association

On April 16 and 17, 2019 some of Canada’s most successful female energy leaders met in Toronto to share their industry knowledge and experience with professionals from across Canada’s energy sector.

Currently, 7.6 million women represent 48% of the working population in Canada. In the electricity sector, women make up only 26% of the workforce.

In addition to analyzing key trends in the global energy market, panel sessions and group discussions did not shy away from the issues facing women in a traditionally male-dominated industry.

Skill development workshops on mastering negotiation and activating your own power to change the world of work encouraged attendees to leverage their strengths to improve organizational performance and move up.

Here are five empowering takeaways from the conference that will encourage women (and men) in their professions:

  1. Dive in!

Don’t get caught up in the details when starting a project or presentation. According to Annette Verschuren, Chair and Chief Executive Officer of NRStar Inc., a progressive energy storage development company, and former president of Home Depot Canada and president and co-founder of Michael’s of Canada, 60% is ready enough.

Many women believe things must be lined up 100% before taking action, but that can hold you back from taking a risk that could lead to success. Instead, strive for a mediocre strategy and excellent execution.

  1. Use your networks

Aida Cipolla, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer at Toronto Hydro presented on the importance of building internal and external networks. Cipolla suggests that networking is vital to career and personal growth. It can raise your personal profile, broaden your opportunities, and aid in working through industry challenges by learning from others.

Set a schedule and reminder for regular touch points with your contacts. Check in with those around you and see what you can do to help others reach their goals. Networking is about giving first and receiving later.

  1. Have a “growth mindset”

It’s easy to get discouraged as challenges arise but having a growth mindset versus a fixed mindset can make all the difference when there are obstacles to overcome.

A growth mindset promotes learning from mistakes, challenging oneself, and feeling inspired by the success of others. Individuals with fixed mindsets tend to give up when feeling frustrated, engage in negativity when things don’t work out, and back away from challenges. One way to combat this is by simply doing more and thinking less.

  1. Be aware of unconscious bias

An all-male panel from Hydro One Networks Inc. explained how they became champions for diversity and inclusion after attending a Men Advocating Real Change (MARC) workshop. The program developed by global non-profit Catalyst has been successful in bringing awareness to men and women about the unconscious biases that often exist in the workplace and how to transform them.

Catalyst research revealed that less than half of men in the workplace believe gender stereotyping is a barrier to women’s advancement. By stepping out of their comfort zone and attending a MARC workshop, the panelists gained an understanding for what their colleagues were experiencing and became allies for change.

  1. Don’t give up

Ariana Huffington says that, “Failure is a stepping stone to success.” In this light, challenges become opportunities to help you progress rather than hindrances that hold you back.

Fear of failure can be paralyzing. Speakers suggested building resilience by trying new things and being willing to make mistakes. Detach from the outcome and with each experience, you’ll build the confidence necessary to find the success you seek.

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Register today for our side event at CEM10/MI-4

You’re invited to attend our side event during the upcoming Clean Energy Ministerial and Mission Innovation (CEM10/MI-4).

Please register here by May 13, 2019.

After this date, the CEM10/MI-4 task team will be closing registration and we will not be able to add you to the list of registrants.

Please note:

  • Background checks will be performed on all registrants.
  • The side event room location will be provided at the registration desk.
  • You must register for each side event separately. The full list of side events can be found here.
  • CNA is located at booth 910 in the Innovation Showcase.
  • Separate registration for the Innovation Showcase is required and can be completed here.

Should you have any questions, please let us know.

We look forward to seeing you in Vancouver.

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Millennials concerned about climate change, support new nuclear

By John Barrett, President and CEO, Canadian Nuclear Association
Originally published in QP Briefing, February 26, 2019

This Wednesday, the Canadian Nuclear Association kicks off its 2019 Conference and Trade Show at the Westin Hotel in Ottawa.

The theme of CNA2019 is: “New Nuclear: Generating Solutions for Climate and Health.” Over 800 attendees will talk about the innovations in nuclear technology – and how that makes the future of nuclear energy so different from the past.

There is growing evidence that the millennial generation evaluates and supports innovative technologies more strongly when they are seen to bring real solutions to society’s challenges. First and foremost among the solutions is whether the technology can significantly reduce GHG emissions and help decarbonize our energy supply.

This is where new nuclear comes in. The nuclear industry is undergoing a renaissance in innovative solutions that hold the promise of lifting communities out of energy poverty or coal dependence, while enhancing public health through clean air and medical isotopes. Small, ultra-safe reactors could hold the key to significant reductions in GHG emissions, while providing copious amount of clean electricity to communities and industries alike.

In advance of CNA2019, the independent firm Abacus Data was commissioned to measure the views of young Canadians on climate change and the role that nuclear and small modular reactors (SMRs) may play in reducing emissions.

The findings of the online poll* will be presented by Abacus Data CEO David Coletto at a keynote address at the conference on February 28. But here in advance are some of the highlights.

  • Young people were the most concerned about climate change. Sixty-two per cent of those 18-to-29 in age said they were extremely or very concerned about the issue, compared with 54 per cent nationally.
  • Those 18-to-29 were also more likely to say a shift from fossil fuels to low-carbon energy sources was extremely or very important – 69 per cent, compared with 58 per cent for the general population.
  • While the 18-to-29 age group was most likely to believe that nuclear energy created more carbon pollution than oil, they were strongly in support of nuclear replacing higher emitting energy sources after being informed that nuclear was a low-carbon technology.
  • Eighty-nine per cent of those 18-to-29 supported or were open to using nuclear in this scenario, compared to 83 per cent of the overall population.
  • The poll also found that 86 per cent of those 18-to-29 supported or were open to SMRs as an alternative to fossil fuels.

Most importantly, the data shows that when young people, who are most concerned about climate change, are informed that nuclear and new nuclear are low-carbon sources, they quickly become strong supporters.

Canada is home to new nuclear. The innovation is happening throughout the nuclear industry.

It is happening in advanced reactor design, refurbishment of our CANDU fleet, development and use of robotics and 3D printing and artificial intelligence, development of alternative clean power sources such as hydrogen that can be generated through nuclear power.

Canada is emerging internationally as a leading country for the research, development and regulation of small modular reactors, which offer to small and remote communities the possibility, hitherto beyond reach, of unlimited, reliable clean electricity and heat on a 24/7 basis.

All this tells us that new nuclear is not a dream. It’s not around the corner. It’s here now. Come to CNA2019 and see for yourself!

*The survey was conducted online with 2,500 Canadians aged 18+ in February 2019. The margin of error for a comparable probability-based random sample is +/- 1.96 per cent, 19 times out of 20. The data were weighted according to census to ensure sample matched Canada’s population according to age, gender, education, region.

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99 uses for nuclear technology

  1. Producing clean energy
  2. Medical diagnostic procedures
  3. Radiation therapy
  4. Sterilizing medical equipment
  5. Killing bacteria, insects and parasites that cause food-borne diseases
  6. Delaying fruits and vegetables from ripening
  7. Inhibiting root vegetables from sprouting
  8. Halting meat and seafood from spoiling
  9. Producing new crop varieties
  10. Producing hardier crops
  11. The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT)
  12. Preventing the spread of infectious diseases such as Ebola, malaria and Zika
  13. Decontaminating spices
  14. Improving livestock health
  15. Improving water and fertilizer management
  16. Determining nutrient absorption rates
  17. Verifying the integrity of aircraft components
  18. Improving the reliability of automotive engines
  19. Increasing the compatibility of pacemakers with the human body
  20. Developing better delivery systems for pharmaceuticals
  21. Checking welds of gas and oil pipelines
  22. Analyzing the walls of dug holes
  23. Identifying mineral deposits
  24. Searching for underground caves or formations
  25. Verifying the integrity of roads and bridges
  26. Optimizing road life, rutting resistance and overall durability
  27. Producing safe drinking water
  28. Powering space missions
  29. Powering navigation beacons and satellites
  30. Powering ships and submarines
  31. Producing hydrogen
  32. Smoke detectors
  33. Sterilizing cosmetics and hair products
  34. Sterilizing contact lens solution
  35. Producing non-stick frying pans
  36. Preventing static build-up in photocopiers
  37. Making watches and clocks that “glow in the dark”
  38. Emergency exit signs
  39. Compact fluorescent light bulbs
  40. Increasing computer disk memory
  41. Golf balls with longer drives
  42. Lantern mantles
  43. Combating malnutrition
  44. Combating childhood obesity
  45. Analyzing metals, alloys and electronic materials
  46. Identifying extremely small and diluted forensic materials
  47. Characterizing archaeological and historical materials
  48. Carbon dating the age of rocks and organic materials
  49. Studying air pollution and aerosols
  50. Determining the origin, age and distribution of groundwater
  51. Assessing the interconnections between groundwater and surface water
  52. Understanding aquifer recharge systems
  53. Evaluating leakages through dams and irrigation channels
  54. Lake and reservoir dynamics
  55. Calculating flow and sedimentation rates
  56. Analyzing river discharges
  57. Measuring soil moisture
  58. Measuring magnitudes and sources of soil erosion
  59. Detecting and analyzing environmental pollutants
  60. Studying the mixing and flow rates of industrial material
  61. Locating leaks
  62. Measuring industrial equipment wear rates
  63. Thickness gauges for sheet material
  64. Density gauges for control of liquids, powders and solids
  65. Gauges to determine flow, level and weight
  66. X-ray fluorescent analyzers
  67. Gas chromatographs
  68. Instrument calibrators
  69. Krypton leak detectors
  70. Well logging
  71. Locating materials embedded inside others
  72. Detecting corrosion and moisture damage
  73. Measuring blood or plasma volume
  74. Quantifying bone mass
  75. Detecting changes in bone metabolism
  76. Assessing the blood flow to the brain
  77. Looking for hydrocephalus
  78. Diagnosing and following the progression of tumors or infections
  79. Evaluating how well food travels from the stomach to the intestines
  80. Finding bleeding sites within the abdomen
  81. Identifying gall bladder obstructions
  82. Evaluating the effectiveness of a perito-venous shunt
  83. Finding benign liver tumors
  84. Diagnosing cirrhosis, hepatitis, tumors and other digestive tract problems
  85. Finding blood clots in the lungs
  86. Detecting Meckel’s Diverticulum
  87. Detecting adrenal tumors or pheochromocytoma
  88. Detecting coronary artery disease
  89. Locating neuroendocrine tumors
  90. Evaluating a possible parathyroid adenoma
  91. Diagnosing stomach ulcers
  92. Studying kidney function
  93. Studying gland function
  94. Showing the direction of lymphatic drainage from cancer sites
  95. Checking for tear duct blockages
  96. Diagnosing conditions affecting the testicles
  97. Studying thyroid function
  98. Detailing the heart’s ability to pump blood
  99. Diagnosing ischemic bowel disease
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CNA Makes Specific Commitments on Gender Equality

In May 2018 at the Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM-9) in Copenhagen, Canada and Sweden jointly launched the “Equal by 30” campaign, which is aimed at reaching 30% representation of women in the energy sector by 2030.  Parliamentary Secretary Kim Rudd, head of the Canadian Delegation, signed on behalf of Canada. Details of the campaign, its principles and objectives, can be found at www.equalby30.org

Several CNA member companies have become signatories to “Equal by 30” in support of the endeavour and its objectives. CNA signed up in its capacity as the association representing the nuclear industry.

Next step in the “Equal by 30” process is for signatories to develop specific commitments that, once developed and communicated to the “Equal by 30” organizers, will be put on the campaign’s website. The signatory will then be encouraged to report regularly on progress made.

CNA already has a pay equity plan and has reached overall gender balance in its staffing. CNA has flexible working hours and working-from-home arrangements that help to support family-related responsibilities.

In addition, CNA is prepared to make the following commitments, bearing in mind that CNA cannot undertake commitments that are within the sole responsibility and control of its members:

  1. Encourage CNA member companies not currently signatories to the “Equal by 30” campaign to consider signing up to it;
  2. Encourage CNA member companies that are signatories to “Equal by 30” to aim for at least 30% representation of women by 2030 in company positions in which women are currently under-represented;
  3. Encourage CNA members to identify qualified women candidates for election to the CNA Board, with the aim of reaching 30% representation of women on the CNA Board by 2030;
  4. Encourage the CNA Board to nominate a senior leader to support initiatives towards a gender-diverse work environment in the nuclear sector;
  5. Undertake to promote “Equal by 30” and its principles, including facilitating the exchange of best practices and knowledge-sharing where possible within the nuclear sector; and
  6. Continue CNA’s active support of Women in Nuclear (WiN) Canada.

The “Equal by 30” campaign and corporate commitments from energy sector signatories will be a feature item of the forthcoming Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM-10), hosted by the Government of Canada in Vancouver at the end of May.

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Getting markets and economics right panel at CNA2019

On Friday,March 1, at 9 a.m. Dr. Ken Coates, Fiona Reilly, and Keith Matthew take the stage at CNA2019 to discuss new nuclear, getting markets and economics right.

One of the challenges facing New Nuclear is its commercialization – finding and accessing the right markets and getting its own economics right. What steps are needed now and in the future for New Nuclear to establish itself as a viable, affordable clean energy solution not only in Canada but internationally? What are the patterns of finance, ownership and operation that will make large reactors and small reactors attractive to communities and governments?

Dr. Ken Coates is a Professor and Canada Research Chair in Regional Innovation at the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy.  He is also the Macdonald-Laurier Institute’s Senior Policy Fellow in Aboriginal and Northern Canadian Issues. He has served at universities across Canada (UNBC, UNB and Waterloo) and at the University of Waikato (New Zealand), an institution known internationally for its work on Indigenous affairs.

Fiona Reilly is Managing Director – FiRe Energy Ltd. and Chair of the Expert Finance Working Group NED – at the Nuclear Industry Association. She is a world leading authority on nuclear power, with over 20 years’ experience in the industry. She is also recognised as an expert in the development and financing of nuclear projects by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and has served as a designated expert on the financing, development and structuring of nuclear projects at special meetings of the IAEA.

Keith Matthew is the President and Director of the Council for the Advancement of Native Development Officers (CANDO). He is also founder of Seklep Business Services and a member and former chief of the Simpcw First Nation. He served for five years as chief and five years as Councilor up until December 2010.

For more information about CNA2019 visit https://cna.ca/cna2019/.