Tag Archives: Canadian Nuclear Association

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IEA report stresses need for maintaining nuclear

The world will have an almost impossible task of meeting climate targets if nuclear energy is not increased.

IEA Director Fatih Birol.

That’s the conclusion of a report by the International Energy Agency (IEA) that was released at the 10th Clean Energy Ministerial in Vancouver in May.

In its report, “Nuclear Power in a Clean Energy System,” the IEA said if governments don’t change their current policies, advanced economies will be on track to lose two-thirds of their current nuclear fleet, risking a huge increase in CO2 emissions.

“Without action to provide more support for nuclear power, global efforts to transition to a cleaner energy system will become drastically harder and more costly,” IEA Director Fatih Birol said.

“Wind and solar energy need to play a much greater role in order for countries to meet sustainability goals, but it is extremely difficult to envisage them doing so without help from nuclear power.”

The report made eight policy recommendations to governments, including authorizing lifetime extensions if safe for current plants, supporting new build and supporting innovative designs, such as small modular reactors.

The IEA estimates that it would cost approximately $1.6 trillion between 2018 and 2040 in additional investment to replace existing nuclear with renewable energy, supporting technologies and infrastructure. That works out to $80 billion higher per year on average for advanced economies.

The study also notes the past contribution of nuclear energy to the climate.

“Globally, nuclear power output avoided 63 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide (GtCO2) from 1971 to 2018,” the IEA noted. “Without nuclear power, emissions from electricity generation would have been almost 20% higher, and total energy-related emissions 6% higher, over that period. Without nuclear power, emissions from electricity generation would have been 25% higher in Japan, 45% higher in Korea and over 50% higher in Canada over the period 1971-2018.”

The IEA understands the best path to decarbonization, but currently, many people in the clean energy space believe in a single solution.

We need all available tools and technologies to reduce emissions. And they must complement each other and work together in an integrated clean energy system. That system should include nuclear.

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How to get millennials aboard the nuclear bandwagon

A recent poll by Abacus Data found Millennials are especially open to using nuclear to combat climate change once informed that it is a low-carbon energy source.

The poll found there is growing evidence that the millennial generation evaluates and supports innovative technologies more strongly when they are seen to bring real solutions to society’s challenges. First and foremost, among the solutions is whether it can significantly reduce GHG emissions and help decarbonize our energy supply.

To measure how familiar people are with the carbon impact of nuclear energy, Abacus asked whether certain energy sources had greater, equal or lesser impact than oil. The results revealed that only 38 per cent of Canadians were aware that nuclear is a lower carbon form of energy compared to oil.

When informed that nuclear power emissions are similar to solar, wind and hydro, and asked how they felt about the idea of using nuclear in situations where it could replace higher emitting fuels, a large majority (84 per cent) said they are supportive or open to this.

The findings were more pronounced for young people. Eighty-nine per cent of those 18-to-29 supported or were open to using nuclear in this scenario, compared to 83 per cent of the overall population. The poll also found that 86 per cent of those 18-to-29 supported or were open to small modular reactors (SMRs) as an alternative to fossil fuels.

Climate change seems to be driving young people looking for solutions to replace fossil fuels.

Young people were the most concerned about climate change. Sixty-two per cent of those 18-to-29 said they were extremely or very concerned about the issue, compared with 54 per cent overall.

Those 18-to-29 were also more likely to say a shift from fossil fuels to low-carbon energy sources was extremely or very important – 69 per cent, compared with 58 per cent for the general population.

“These results make clear that for many people, the issue of climate change and the need to reduce carbon emissions, means being open to potential new roles for nuclear technology,” explained Abacus Chair Bruce Anderson. “To date, many people are unaware of the carbon-reducing contribution that nuclear can offer, and the data indicate that when informed about the facts, there is broad interest in exploring potential trials in a regulated context.”

The survey was conducted online for the Canadian Nuclear Association with 2,500 Canadians aged 18 and over from February 8 to 12, 2019. The margin of error for a comparable probability-based random sample of the same size is +/- 1.9%, 19 times out of 20.

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World nuclear output reached new high in 2018

The latest International Energy Agency (IEA) numbers are out and nuclear power continued to grow in 2018, despite concerns about reactor closures in the U.S. and elsewhere.

In its March “Global Energy & CO2 Status Report,” the IEA said overall global energy consumption grew by 2.3 per cent due to “a robust global economy as well as higher heating and cooling needs in some parts of the world.”

The increase in energy consumption meant CO2 emissions rose 1.7 per cent last year, a new record high.

Gas accounted for 47 per cent of the new energy growth and nuclear represented seven per cent of new growth.

The growth in nuclear was based largely on new capacity in China and the restart of four reactors in Japan, according to the IEA.

In related news, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that nuclear output reached a peak in 2018, surpassing the previous peak set in 2010.

This happened despite the fact that seven reactors have been taken out of service since 2010 and only one new reactor has been added to the grid. The increase was due to reactor upgrades that improved efficiency and reactors shortening the time they are out of operation for maintenance.The IEA has been more vocal in recent months about the importance of nuclear energy.

In February, the IEA held a workshop on the role of nuclear power in the clean energy system, which will lead to a report on the issue, and IEA Executive Director Dr. Fatih Birol spoke on the margins of the Canadian Nuclear Association’s annual conference in Ottawa.

“Nuclear energy plays an important role in both energy security and sustainability in today’s energy mix,” Birol said at a recent IEA workshop.

“However, without appropriate policy attention, its contribution will shrink, creating challenges for meeting our energy policy goals in the future. As an all-fuels and all-technologies organization, the IEA monitors the development of nuclear energy and its potential role in the clean energy transitions.”

The IEA has an important role in making policymakers understand the scope of the challenge the world faces in providing clean and reliable electricity as transportation electrifies and more and more people in the developing world become electricity consumers.

Governments need to act pragmatically and, like the IEA, realize the role all technologies can play in the energy system of the future.

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John Gorman visits SNC-Lavalin mock-up facility

On Wednesday, July 3 CNA’s new President and CEO John Gorman had the privilege of visiting the SNC-Lavalin control room simulator and manufacturing shop in Mississauga, Ontario.

Below are some photos they took during his visit.

John in the CANDU 6 Main Control Room Simulator speaking with Navid Badie (Senior Vice-President, Engineering & Chief Nuclear Engineer), right, and Michael Courtney (Advisor, Marketing, Strategy & External Relations)
John in the CANDU 6 Main Control Room Simulator looking at the Main Heat Transport Panels
Jeffrey de Beyer explaining to John how the single-rail slide table of the Calandria mock-up functions for training and tool qualification
Elisabeth Leon (Manager, SP3 Project Delivery) and John in front of a pressure-test system for Fuel Channel Closures
John holding a part made for the iron chamber with Peter Schicht (Manager, Manufacturing)
Peter Schicht showing John the waterjet which uses water to cut various materials
John looking into the Radiation Lab (largest in Canada) with Greg Squires (Senior Project Management Specialist)
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On Queen Street: new president of Canadian Nuclear Association excited about emerging technology for industry

By Jesse Cnockaert
Originally published in The Lobby Monitor, May 15, 2019

As Canada works to reduce its carbon footprint, John Gorman sees his background in the solar power industry as something that will be of benefit in his new role as president of the Canadian Nuclear Association (CNA).

“It’s going to take more than wind and solar and battery storage to meet all of the challenges that we’re facing when it comes to decarbonizing the electricity system and meeting this growing demand globally,” said Gorman, who took over at CNA on May 13. “From where I come from, I just can’t see how we can meet those challenges without nuclear energy. So, when the opportunity came to lead the CNA, particularly at this time when there are exciting new technologies in nuclear coming out, I thought it was an important opportunity to be able to contribute and promote Canadian technology here and abroad.”

Gorman takes over the position from former president John Barrett, and is currently registering to lobby on behalf of CNA.

He comes to CNA after more than seven years as president of the Canadian Solar Industries Association, the trade group that represents the solar energy industry across Canada.

Now with CNA, Gorman will be leading the organization that represents Canada’s nuclear industry.

Gorman may have switched his professional allegiance to a different source of electricity generation, but he considers both solar and nuclear as renewable forms of energy. He said his involvement in the energy industry stems from a personal desire to contribute in some way to climate change solutions.

“I think there’s a lot of work that has to continue in terms of educating the public about the role nuclear plays in Canada and can continue to play globally,” he said. “We’re going to need everything we’ve got in terms of clean energy for these problems.”

Two of CNA’s priorities in their discussions with the federal government are the international trade of nuclear technology, and greenhouse-gas emissions trading under Canada’s commitment in the Kyoto Protocol, the registry shows.

In the Kyoto Protocol, an international treaty signed in 1997, countries accepted targets for limiting or reducing carbon emissions. Any countries with emission units to spare – emissions that are permitted but not used – can engage in “emissions trading,” where those units are sold to other countries that have exceeded their targets.

Gorman also sees this as an important time for the nuclear industry because of the emerging small modular reactors (SMRs) industry. SMRs are nuclear fission reactors designed to be smaller in size than conventional nuclear reactors, and can therefore be produced in larger numbers. These reactors are made to be portable and scalable, so that nuclear energy can be taken to smaller power grids and off-grid areas, like northern communities and reserves.

In November 2018, Natural Resources released the SMR Roadmap, a document intended to establish a long-term vision for Canada’s nuclear industry. In the roadmap, Canada is described as having “one of the world’s most promising domestic markets for SMRs,” and places the potential value for SMRs in Canada at approximately $5.3 billion between 2025 and 2040.

Natural Resources called SMRs an emerging global market that could be valued at approximately $150 billion per year by 2040, in a news release accompanying the roadmap.

Gorman’s background in energy also includes more than six years representing Canada’s solar industry as a member of the executive committee of the International Energy Agency (IEA).

The IEA is a policy advisory organization made up of 30 member countries to promote clean energy and share ideas for best practices.

He is also a former board member of the Green Ontario Fund, which prior to its cancellation in 2018 by Ontario Premier Doug Ford, was a non-profit provincial agency tasked with reducing greenhouse gas pollution in buildings and industry to help the province meet emission reduction targets.

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CNA Announces 2019 Board of Directors

The Canadian Nuclear Association (CNA) announced at its Annual General Meeting last week the election of its new Board of Directors to oversee the association’s strategy and overall direction.

Here are the 2019-20 board members:

  • Frank Saunders, President of the Nuclear Innovation Institute (Chair of the CNA)
  • John MacQuarrie, President BWXT (Vice-Chair of the CNA)
  • Jennifer Rowe, Senior Vice President, Corporate Affairs, Ontario Power Generation
  • Alice Wong, Senior Vice President and Chief Corporate Officer, Cameco Corporation
  • William A. Fox III, Executive Vice-President, Nuclear, SNC-Lavalin
  • Brett Plummer, Vice-President Nuclear & Chief Nuclear Officer, NB Power
  • Mike Marsh, President and Chief Executive Officer, SaskPower
  • Eddie Saab, President, Canada, Westinghouse Electric Company
  • Sam Bambino, Vice President, AECON Nuclear
  • Pierre Tremblay, President and Chief Executive Officer, AECOM
  • Sanjay Krishnan, Vice-President Nuclear, Tetra Tech
  • Spencer Fox, President, E.S. Fox
  • *Jim Sarvinis, Managing Director, Power, HATCH
  • David Campbell, Senior Vice President, Veolia Nuclear Solutions
  • Michael Knaszak, Senior Vice President & Project Director, Sargent & Lundy
  • Mark Lesinski, President & Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Nuclear Laboratories Ltd.
  • Julie West, Vice President, Nuclear Safety & Licensing, Kinectrics
  • Vik Tathe, Vice President, Business Development, EnergySolutions
  • Richard Sexton, President and Chief Executive Officer, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
  • David Cates, President & Chief Executive Officer, Denison Mines
  • Howard Shearer, Chief Executive Officer, Hitachi Canada
  • *Bradley Michell, Ste Leader, IMI Critical Engineering
  • Michael Chatlani, Vice President, Marketing & Sales, Power Systems and Simulation, L3 MAPPS
  • Jason Jermark, Vice President, Power Generation Services, Siemens Canada Limited
  • Jordan Chou, President and Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Power Utility Services Ltd.
  • Milton Caplan, President, MZ Consulting Inc.
  • Jeremy Rasmussen, Chief Technology Officer, PTAG
  • Nick Aroutzidis, President & Chief Executive Officer, NA Engineering Associates Inc.
  • Nigel Fonseca, Senior Vice President, Ontario and Western Canada, Alithya
  • Bob Walker, Vice President, Power Workers’ Union
  • Scott Travers, President, The Society of United Professionals
  • *Keith Stratton, President, Canadian Nuclear Society
  • Matthew Mairinger, Canadian Affairs Chair, North American Young Generation Nuclear (NAYGN)
  • *Lisa McBride, President, Women in Nuclear Canada

*New board member