Tag Archives: Canadian Nuclear Association

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Deep Geologic Repository: A Matter Of Science

By: Dr. John Barrett
President & Chief Executive Officer
Canadian Nuclear Association

The recent CTV W5 segment on Ontario Power Generation’s proposed Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) in Kincardine, Ontario, left the impression that some opponents viewed the location of the project as a simple act of convenience.

It is not a matter of convenience but a matter of science.

The DGR project intends to store low- and intermediate-level nuclear waste deep underground. In public consultations regarding the DGR, and again in the W5 segment, there is a suggestion that OPG chose the Kincardine site for its convenience, while ignoring concerns that radioactive material might seep through the rock and contaminate Lake Huron.

This flies directly in the face of the 2015 report of the federal Joint Review Panel, which held more than 33 days of public hearings and reviews more than 12,500 pages of evidence. The Panel’s Environmental Assessment called the geology of the area “highly suitable.”

Here’s why.

The host rock under the Kincardine site is four times the strength of concrete, and it would take 1 million years for one molecule of water to pass one metre in this rock.

The rock was formed more than 450 million years ago. It has remained intact despite two mountain formations and nine ice ages. Above the host rock rests 200 metres of impermeable shale.

Taken together, the rocks of this unique formation provide a natural barrier that scientists from around the world agree is perfect for permanently and safely isolating waste.

While W5 painted a picture of a “town divided,” this is actually not accurate.

The DGR actually has broad community acceptance. The Municipality of Kincardine reaffirmed its support for the project as recently as this past February via a resolution passed by the municipal council. Similar expressions of support for the DGR were also passed by Bruce County, which comprises 8 municipalities, including Kincardine, and by Huron-Kinloss and Saugeen Shores.

Much of the low- and intermediate-level waste that DGR will store currently sits above ground at OPG’s Western Waste Management Facility, located at the Bruce Power site at Kincardine. Is keeping it there indefinitely the better choice?

The answer finds its roots in moral responsibility and in evidence-based science.

Since our generation benefitted from the use of nuclear-generated electricity, we also bear responsibility for the waste. Responsibility rests with us, not our grandchildren.
The DGR is based on rigorous science, not “convenience”. It is planned in ideal geology, with world-leading engineering. The federal Joint Review Panel reports states the DGR will perform its job for 1,000,000 years.

The Deep Geologic Repository provides a way to manage our responsibility safely and securely. It will be a lasting solution for the waste, ensuring peace of mind.

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ONTARIO’S NUCLEAR ADVANTAGE: LOW-COST ELECTRICITY, JOBS & GROWTH; HEALTH & CLEAN AIR

Ontario has a nuclear advantage. Yet many in the province don’t realize it or how much it benefits them and their everyday lives.
When we flick on the lights, turn on the computer, or charge electric vehicles, we give no thought to how our electricity is produced. We should take comfort in knowing that nuclear power is the backbone of Ontario’s electricity system.

Nuclear power provides families and businesses with a low-cost, safe, reliable source of electricity, and it makes our Energy Star appliances even cleaner when they run on low GHG-emitting Nuclear. For those who like solid facts: Ontario’s nuclear plants supply over 13,000 MW of clean power – or, about 60% of Ontarians’ needs every day of the week, every week of the year. What’s more, as Ontario’s electricity demand increases, with people turning to electric vehicles and the province growing in population and economic activity, nuclear power can expand to ensure our electricity stays clean.

When we think of the challenges of climate change, and the need for carbon-pricing, we do not automatically realize that nuclear power is virtually GHG-emissions-free. The clean electricity from nuclear generation is not impacted by cap-and-trade costs.

When we urge our governments to do something about the effects of climate change, we don’t always grasp that Ontario’s ability to end coal-fired generation was largely made possible by the return to service of two Bruce Power reactors, and the return to commercial operation of units 1 and 4 at Pickering.
The clean, smog-free air in parts of southern Ontario is a blessing to those with asthma or breathing problems. Today, Ontario has over 90% of its electricity powered by clean energy sources. Nuclear shoulders 2/3rds of that.

When we think of concerns about hydro bills, we often tend to lump all generation sources together. We assume they’re all equally to blame for producing expensive electricity. But that’s not the fact. Nuclear generation in Ontario is currently paid 6.6 cents/kWh compared to the average residential price of 11 cents/kWh, according to the Ontario Energy Board. And the power that’s bought by Ontarian consumers is reliable, not intermittent, and not dependent on the fluctuations of weather. Thankfully.

When we think of friends and family who have undergone treatment for cancer and when we assume that the medical equipment used around them is safely sterilized, we don’t say thank goodness for nuclear reactors. But we should. The reactors at Bruce Power and OPG’s Pickering plant produce 70% of the world’s Cobalt-60, used to attack cancer cells. Cobalt-60 is also used to sterilize gowns, gloves, implantable devices and syringes in hospitals in Ontario and around the world. What other energy sources treat cancer and save lives? Nuclear does.

When we think of high-tech, good-paying jobs for our families and children, we seldom look first to Ontario’s nuclear industry. But do Ontarians realize how many jobs are supported by the nuclear industry and how much communities benefit from having companies in the nuclear supply chain? The nuclear industry in Canada contributes over $6 billion annually to the economy and supports 60,000 direct and indirect jobs. Many of these are in Ontario, and they stay in Ontario because of the expertise and high-quality manufacturing and engineering skills required by the industry.

When it comes to innovation in advanced energy technologies, you only have to cite the potential of small modular reactors (SMRs) or the next generation of inherently safe reactors that recycle fuel to feel the excitement among the younger generation of scientists, engineers, environmentalists. They see increasingly what new innovations in nuclear can do to bring reliable, safe, emissions-free energy – in the quantities needed – to an energy-hungry world desperately wanting more. They will be the generation to deliver this extraordinary benefit to humanity.
Take all of these and add them up. What you get is Ontario’s incredible nuclear advantage. Time to recognize this and capitalize on it. Nuclear provides solutions to the pressing needs of today and tomorrow. Time to think afresh about nuclear and its contribution to growth, to the environment, to an innovative, clean energy future.

An opportunity for such thinking is the Ontario Government’s forthcoming Long-Term Energy Plan. This is where Ontario’s nuclear advantage is established, underpinned and presented imaginatively for the future.

For our part, the Canadian Nuclear Association (CNA) is proud to launch a new website that promotes fact-based awareness and understanding of Canada’s nuclear success story: www.ontariosnuclearadvantage.com Ontario’s world-class nuclear sector is something of which Ontarians and all Canadians should be proud.

CNA2017

Discover Your Inner Leader with Drew Dudley at CNA2017

Wake up bright and early on Friday, February 24, to hear from CNA2017 breakfast keynote speaker Drew Dudley.

Drew is a leadership educator who believes “leadership is not a characteristic reserved for the extraordinary.” Over the years he has worked to help people discover the leader within themselves.

Drew’s interest in developing people’s leadership began when he was the Leadership Development Coordinator at the University of Toronto. In 2010 he founded Nuance Leadership Development Services, a company that creates leadership curricula for communities, organizations and individuals. That same year Drew gave a TED Talk in which he called on all of us to “celebrate leadership as the everyday act of improving each other’s lives.”

For more information about CNA2017 visit cna.ca/2017-conference.

CNA2017

CNA2017 Welcomes Laura Dawson as Keynote

CNA2017 is excited to welcome Laura Dawson to the stage as its lunch keynote speaker on Thursday, February 23.

Laura is the Director of the Canada Institute. Named one of Canada’s Top 100 foreign policy influencers by the Hill Times in 2014, Laura is a speaker, writer, and thought leader on Canada-U.S., NAFTA, TPP, and international trade issues. Previously, she served as the senior advisor on economic affairs at the United States Embassy in Ottawa and taught international trade and Canada-U.S. relations at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs. Laura continues to serve as Emeritus Advisor at Dawson Strategic, which provides advice to business on cross-border trade, market access and regulatory issues. She is a Fellow at the Canadian Defence & Foreign Affairs Institute and serves on the board of the Council of the Great Lakes Region.

For more information about CNA2017 visit cna.ca/2017-conference.

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Setting the Record Straight on the Price of Electricity

By John Barrett
President and CEO
Canadian Nuclear Association

Environmental Defence has a new online campaign in which they are trying to pin the blame for Ontario’s electricity costs on nuclear, while at the same time ignoring nuclear’s role in helping Ontario’s landmark achievement of ending coal-fired electricity generation.

These alternative facts have been discredited by many, including the findings of Ontario’s Auditor General’s 2015 report on electric power system planning.

On electricity prices, the low cost of nuclear was recently highlighted in a news release from the Ontario Energy Board, which indicated nuclear accounted for only 38 per cent of the Global Adjustment while generating 59 per cent of the electricity.
In 2016, nuclear power generated 61% of Ontario’s electricity at well below the amounts paid to other generators. In fact, the average price of nuclear was 6.6 cents per kWh compared to the average residential price of 11 cents per kWh.

Wind and solar make up a small amount of Ontario’s electricity bill because they make up a small amount of Ontario’s electricity grid. Wind generated only six per cent of Ontario’s electricity in 2016 and solar less than one per cent. Despite this modest output, wind and solar nevertheless accounted for 26 per cent of the Global Adjustment.

There is a myth that, due to the capital investments required in nuclear power, the consequence is a high price of power. This simply isn’t true. That’s because nuclear facilities operate for decades and generate large volumes of electricity on a consistent basis. Ontario’s nuclear facilities have a demonstrated track-record of high reliability. That’s why the province is reinvesting in them now.

Environmental Defence has also failed to mention nuclear’s important role in Ontario’s phase-out of coal in 2014 and ending smog days across the province, suggesting it was new wind and solar alone that got the job done.

A fact check would show that between 2000 and 2013, nuclear-powered electrical generation rose 20 percent in Ontario, coinciding with a 27 percent drop in coal-fired electricity. During the same period, non-hydro renewables increased to 3.4 percent from one percent. This major transition to a cleaner Ontario could not have happened without nuclear.

During that period, Bruce Power doubled its fleet of operating reactors from four to eight, becoming the world’s largest nuclear generating station. While more renewable energy did come on line, Bruce Power estimates they provided 70% of the carbon free energy needed to replace the power from the shutdown of coal plants.

The long-term investment programs currently underway across Ontario’s nuclear fleet, including Pickering, Darlington and Bruce Power, will secure this low-cost source of electricity over the long-term, while meeting our needs today.

Nuclear-generated electricity was the right choice for Ontario decades ago. It remains the right choice today.

OPG and Bruce Power recognize the cost of electricity for Ontario families and businesses is an important issue across the Province. Both companies are committed to clean air and continuing to provide low cost electricity for Ontario homes and businesses in the short, medium and long-term.

CNA2017

It’s Not Too Late to Register for a Workshop at CNA2017!

In addition to a full conference and trade show, the CNA is holding two separate workshops on Wednesday, February 22, from 1-4 pm.

Workshop #1: Public Affairs

Participants of the public affairs workshop will hear from Michele Austin, Senior Advisor at Summa Strategies, about how to communicate effectively with the Trudeau government and the Trump administration, as well as how to leverage the power of social media.

Following, participants will engage in government-style roundtable discussions around honing the Canadian nuclear industry’s key messaging on the issues of:

  • Climate change & the environment
  • Waste management & decommissioning
  • Safety & security
  • Innovation & new technology
  • Jobs & the economy

Workshop #2: Regulatory Affairs

Participants of the regulatory affairs workshop will hear from a range of guest speakers on the latest regulatory developments impacting the nuclear industry, including:

  • The Canadian Environmental Assessment Act
  • The Fisheries Act
  • The Navigable Waters Act
  • Regulatory framework updates by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC)

Adding a workshop to your CNA2017 registration is easy!

If you’ve already registered for CNA2017, locate your confirmation email (“CNA2017 Registration Confirmation”) and follow the link to edit your registration as seen in the image below.

If you haven’t already registered for CNA2017, this is your opportunity to kill two birds with one stone! Visit https://cna.ca/2017-conference/registration/ for pricing information and the registration form. Hurry, though, because late fees apply as of January 28!