Tag Archives: CNA

Uncategorized

CNA a proud signatory to Equal by 30

The Canadian Nuclear Association is proud to be a signatory to Equal by 30, along with our members Bruce Power, Ontario Power Generation and Canadian Nuclear Laboratories.

Equal by 30 commits Canada and other participating countries to the goal of achieving equal pay, equal leadership and equal opportunities by 2030 in the energy sector.

CNA President John Barrett was on hand for the launch of the campaign at this year’s Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM) in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Check out the new Equal by 30 website to learn more about the importance of gender equality in the clean energy sector.

Uncategorized

Nuclear Science Week

The following post is published on behalf of the Canadian Nuclear Society (CNS).

‘NUCLEAR SCIENCE WEEK’ initiative by the Durham Region, UOIT, Toronto, Sheridan Park and Golden Horseshoe Branches of the CNS
In partnership with Durham College, UOIT and OCNI

We are planning the second edition of our Student Job Fair for the Nuclear Industry as part of Nuclear Science Week, to take place on: Tuesday, October 16, 2018 at the UOIT/Durham College North Oshawa Campus.

We are encouraging all CNA member companies that are actively or potentially hiring to make up the core of the
participants in this important outreach event. We could have as many as 50 employers and exhibitors to help us fill the gymnasium on campus!

    1.  Meet over 600 students “Under One Roof” from colleges and universities in the Greater Toronto and Golden Horseshoe areas, and beyond – not just students in nuclear-related fields, but in other skills and professions that can benefit the industry. Other organizations will be there (Labour Unions, COG, UNENE, etc).
    2. A great venue offered by Durham College and UOIT, with catered food for students and exhibitors.
    3. Exhibitor booths of great value.
    4. Event to be held in the late week-day afternoon to facilitate student participation, and simplify event logistics.
    5. Educational sessions in parallel with the job fair to keep the students engaged for the duration of the event. These will be held on the gym floor.
    6. Exhibitors will have the opportunity to visit UOIT and Durham College facilities prior to the Job Fair

We thank the companies and organizations who participated in 2017, and hope that you will return this year. We welcome new participants, and encourage you to register early (you can save on the booth price, and you can help us advertise a full venue when the bulk on the students register in September).

Here is a bird’s eye view of the program:

Please go to our website www.cns-snc.ca/events/nuc-jobs2018 for further details and to register. Consider:

  • Over 600 college and university students from around Ontario and beyond in a 4h session.
  • Over 50 employers and support organizations.
  • Low registration fee of $450 ($340 early-bird) gets you a 10’x10’ booth supplied with electricity, table and chairs, food and beverages for 2 attendees.
  • Opportunities for sponsorships to support our students (pizza) and general expenses associated with running the event – check our website for details:
    • Platinum: $5,000
    • Gold: $2,000
    • Silver: $1,000

Partner with us at the Job Fair for the Nuclear Industry. Get involved with our youth! Register early!

Uncategorized

CNA Has a New Key Messages App!

The CNA has a new key messages app and it’s a significant improvement over the previous version.

The free, user-friendly app features key messages around popular nuclear-related topics, along with well-documented proof-points.

This new version was developed internally so that the CNA has complete control over the look and functionality. Changes and additions can also be easily managed this way.

Originally designed with CNA members in mind, this app can be used by anyone to explain and justify the use of nuclear technology in Canada and worldwide.

The app can be accessed by searching in the App Store (iPhone) or Google Play (Android) using appropriate keywords or by following these links:

We are very excited about this new digital addition to our collateral, and encourage you to share the news with friends and colleagues.

Uncategorized

2018 Canadian Nuclear Achievement Awards – Call for Nominations

We are announcing the Call for Nominations for the 2018 Canadian Nuclear Achievement Awards, jointly sponsored by the Canadian Nuclear Society (CNS) and the Canadian Nuclear Association (CNA). These Awards represent an opportunity to recognize individuals who have made significant contributions, technical and non-technical, to various aspects of nuclear science and technology in Canada.

Nominations may be submitted for any of the following Awards:
• W. B. Lewis Medal
• Ian McRae Award
• Harold A. Smith Outstanding Contribution Award
• Innovative Achievement Award
• John S. Hewitt Team Achievement Award
• Education and Communication Award
• George C. Laurence Award for Nuclear Safety
• Fellow of the Canadian Nuclear Society
• E. Jervis Award

The deadline to submit nominations is January 19, 2018. The Awards will be officially presented during the CNS Annual Conference held June 3 – 6, 2018 in Saskatoon, SK.

For detailed information on the nomination package, Awards criteria, and how to submit the nomination please visit: https://cns-snc.ca/cns/awards.

If you have any questions, please contact Ruxandra Dranga, Chair – CNS/CNA Honours and Awards Committee by email at awards@cns-snc.ca.

Uncategorized

Powering Space Missions with Nuclear Science

Recently, the Trump administration inked its commitment to future space missions with a $19.5 billion dollar budget announcement to the U.S. Space Agency. Among the projects NASA has slated include a human mission to Mars sometime after 2030 and a Canada-U.S. partnership could help to provide the power to get there.

Studying the solar system is no easy feat. Minimal sunlight and severe weather conditions are just two challenges that face outer space explorations. On Mars, nighttime temperatures can fall below -70 degrees Celsius and violent dust storms can destroy solar panels. Harsh environments and ever evolving missions require an effective power and heat source for spacecraft.

Enter nuclear science and radioisotope power systems.

Billions of miles away from a gas station or electric charging station, radioisotope power systems (RPS) have allowed scientists to research and study the limits of our solar system. Electricity is produced from the decay of the isotope plutonium 238 (Pu-238). As the isotope decays it gives off a tremendous amount of heat energy which is converted into electricity. With a half-life of 88 years, a radioisotope power system is able to provide continuous energy for long term deep space missions. As compared to solar power, an RPS can reach into deep space where solar power is ineffective.

However, there is a limited supply of Pu-238 that is needed for deep space research leaving the future of deep space exploration potentially in the dark.

Enter a Canadian-U.S. collaboration and a proposal to shift space research into high gear. A partnership between Technical Solutions Management (TSM), Ontario Power Generation (OPG), Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL) and Pacific Northwest National Labs (PNNL) would support and augment the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) program to renew the production of Pu-238, allowing scientists to continue their exploration of the solar system.

“Our hope is to land a contract to expand the amount of Pu-238 that is available for space exploration,” according to Glen Elliott, Director, Business Development, Ontario Power Generation.

Mars Rover: Curiosity

If approved, the mission could be well on its way to powering future space ventures in the next 5 years, by 2022. The concept would rely on a commercial reactor to produce the necessary isotope, specifically OPG’s Darlington reactor.

“The flexibility of the plan makes it ideal. Depending on the mission requirements, it could be scaled up or down customizing the amount of fuel needed,” according to Elliott. “The Darlington reactor has online fueling capability and an ideal neutron flux so you can precisely control the irradiation time.”

A neutron flux is comprised of two elements; the speed and distance that the neutrons cover. Like football players on a field, the neutron flux is the speed at which the players are running and the total distance of the field that they cover.

The other benefit of the Darlington reactor is that it can produce the fuel needed for radioisotope power systems while performing its primary objective of producing electricity.

“This project is just another example of the broad economic and societal benefits of nuclear power. It provides clean, low-cost power, it helps in the medical world and if successful can be a part of the next generation of space travel,” said Jeff Lyash, President & Chief Executive Officer, Ontario Power Generation.

The proposal would help ensure an adequate global supply of Pu-238 for space missions and strengthen a Canada-U.S. partnership while creating jobs, boosting the economy and advancing the field of science exploration.

Uncategorized

Nuclear Science & The World’s Water Supply

One the largest contributors to global water pollution, the textile dyeing industry accounts for one-fifth of all industrial wastewater. However, the world’s leading textile producer is hoping to change that thanks to nuclear technology.

China recently announced that it will open its first wastewater treatment plant that will clean and treat water using an electron beam. The announcement made by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) underscores the importance of nuclear science in addressing global water concerns.

“Despite advances in conventional wastewater treatment technology in recent years, radiation remains the only technology that can treat the most stubborn colorants in wastewater,” said Sunil Sabharwal, Radiation Processing Specialist at the IAEA.

The compounds that are used in textile dyes are made up of complex molecules making it impossible for bacteria, traditionally used in wastewater treatment, to break down the chemicals and clean the water for industrial reuse. What bacteria can’t do nuclear radiation technology can. Through the use of an electron beam, these complex chemical bonds are broken down and removed from the water; allowing for it to be reused.

The Chinese investment in the first wastewater electron beam treatment plant is an important step forward. The United Nations through their water agency and World Water Day have been raising awareness on the importance of the world’s water resources and the impacts that lack of water and water-related disasters have on humanity.

Since 2003, the organization has focused on addressing water issues. “Water is at the core of sustainable development. Water resources, and the range of services they provide, underpin poverty reduction, economic growth and environmental sustainability. From food and energy security to human and environmental health, water contributes to improvements in social wellbeing and inclusive growth, affecting the livelihoods of billions.”

As reported on by Chinese journalists, the impact of the clothing dyeing industry on the health of nearby residents is alarming. In Xintang, the denim capital of the world, the pollution from the East River has also contaminated nearby soils and there is concern that the pollution will spill its way to other waterways, being carried by currents.

While China’s new wastewater treatment plant won’t solve the problem completely, it will help to address some of the country’s water problems. The new facility will treat 1500 cubic meters of wastewater per day, slightly smaller than an Olympic sized swimming pool. If the new plant is successful, it could lead to more opportunities to clean up China’s water supply. The country is also considering using nuclear science to clean up the wastewater at pharmaceutical plants.