Tag Archives: CNS

Nuclear Education Nuclear Energy Nuclear Outreach

Nuclear 101

Today and tomorrow, TalkNUclear is attending the Canadian Nuclear Society’s (CNS) brand new Nuclear 101 course. It’s described as “a background outreach course for non-technical people working in the industry” but it’s also good for anyone interested in obtaining an understanding of nuclear science, issues, opportunities, challenges, risks, and benefits.

The two-day course includes three modules: the nuclear fuel cycle, a historical review, and understanding the effects of radiation and the associated risks.

Nuclear Fuel Cycle

Basic introduction to nuclear theory and how nuclear power stations work.  An overview of the nuclear fuel cycle (exploration, mining, processing enrichment and nuclear power generation), nuclear waste storage and reprocessing.

Historical Review

History of nuclear power and a review of the different generations of nuclear reactors, including current developments.  Review of nuclear accidents.  The energy challenge and nuclear power’s role in supplying power worldwide.

Radiation and Risk

Ionizing radiation and its effect on the environment and the human body.  Overview of safety, particularly in the context of nuclear accidents.  Risk and the public perception of nuclear power.

Sounds like a good course, doesn’t it? What do you think? Would you be interested in attending Nuclear 101 to learn the fundamentals about how our industry and the technology works, and about its many contributions to society, and how about its exciting history? Let us know in the comments.

Nuclear Energy Statistics

Where is my Electricity Coming From at this Hour?

Checking in with the CNS’ chart of electricity production in Ontario:

Where is my Electricity Coming From at this Hour? (if I live in Ontario)

In the hour between 2:45pm and 3:45pm, thanks to nuclear power generation in Ontario, over 8,000 tonnes of CO2 was avoided. In fact, electricity currently generated by nuclear power plants in Canada saves the potential emission of approximetly 90 million tonnes of greenhouse gases per year that would result from the same amount of electricity generated by burning fossil fuels. Like, for example in Alberta where they don’t have nuclear power plants and instead rely on coal for 41% of their electricity.

Alberta Electricity Generation (As of May 24, 2011 2:30pm)