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Launch of WiN-Saskatchewan

We here at TalkNUclear.ca are very pleased to be sharing this news with you. Today Women-in-Nuclear Canada (WiN) is launching its very first chapter west of Ontario! Congratulations to all involved in this great achievement signalling a growing engagement among the industry and commitment to nuclear all across Canada.

Thanks to WiN-Canada for allowing us to repost this event information from their website.

June 11, 2012

All aboard!!  Yes, the first chapter west of Ontario is about to be launched in Saskatchewan.  Together with Women in Mining, WiN-Saskatchewan will host a networking opportunity for women in nuclear medicine, academia and science to officially announce the launching of the Saskatchewan Chapter of WiN.  This opportunity will provide an important venue for other members of WiN-Canada to interact with the new WiN-Saskatchewan chapter members and to meet the members of our sister organization, Women in Mining (WIM).  WIM is a logical group to join forces with in Saskatchewan since so many of our members will have ties to both organizations.  We invite as many of the WiN members in other parts of Canada to come and join in with the celebration.

As many of you may know, Saskatchewan has a history with nuclear.  Last year, the Government of Saskatchewan announced the development of the Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation at the University of Saskatchewan.  In addition, this province is one of the world’s largest producers of uranium and employs a large number of women in that sector.  The University of Saskatchewan pioneered the use of cobalt 60 in cancer treatments.  And, Saskatchewan also has the Canadian Light Source synchrotron and a slowpoke reactor!  Nuclear is not new to Saskatchewan but having a WiN chapter will be!

The Canadian Nuclear Society has been very supportive and has presented us with this opportunity to get together and celebrate the launching of the new chapter at TCU Place during the CNS 33rd Annual Conference and 36th Annual Student Conference in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.  Important to note, you can attend the WiN meeting without attending the CNS Conference.  Hence, we will need to have members RSVP in advancetheir attendance so we can arrange entry with the CNS conference registrar.  A letter of welcome and an invitation to the meeting is attached to this email.  The formal part of the agenda will be kept short to allow time for networking and interaction.  So, the more people that can attend the better.  This is an exciting milestone for Saskatchewan!

As the chapter gets organized, there will be an announcement on the WiN-Canada website (www.wincanada.org) introducing the new leadership group.  However, until the leadership is in place for WiN-Saskatchewan, all inquiries or comments can be sent to Kathryn Black by email at kblack@saskpower.com or by phone at 306 566-3127!  RSVPs for the event can also be sent to Kathryn at the same contact email.

We are looking forward to welcoming all of the WiN-Canada members who can attend to join us in Saskatoon for this important chapter launch and networking event.

Launch of WiN-Saskatchewan

Location
TCU Place
Saskatoon (Saskatchewan)

Related Links

 

Nuclear Education Nuclear Energy Nuclear Outreach

Nuclear 101

Today and tomorrow, TalkNUclear is attending the Canadian Nuclear Society’s (CNS) brand new Nuclear 101 course. It’s described as “a background outreach course for non-technical people working in the industry” but it’s also good for anyone interested in obtaining an understanding of nuclear science, issues, opportunities, challenges, risks, and benefits.

The two-day course includes three modules: the nuclear fuel cycle, a historical review, and understanding the effects of radiation and the associated risks.

Nuclear Fuel Cycle

Basic introduction to nuclear theory and how nuclear power stations work.  An overview of the nuclear fuel cycle (exploration, mining, processing enrichment and nuclear power generation), nuclear waste storage and reprocessing.

Historical Review

History of nuclear power and a review of the different generations of nuclear reactors, including current developments.  Review of nuclear accidents.  The energy challenge and nuclear power’s role in supplying power worldwide.

Radiation and Risk

Ionizing radiation and its effect on the environment and the human body.  Overview of safety, particularly in the context of nuclear accidents.  Risk and the public perception of nuclear power.

Sounds like a good course, doesn’t it? What do you think? Would you be interested in attending Nuclear 101 to learn the fundamentals about how our industry and the technology works, and about its many contributions to society, and how about its exciting history? Let us know in the comments.

Nuclear Energy Statistics

Where is my Electricity Coming From at this Hour?

Checking in with the CNS’ chart of electricity production in Ontario:

Where is my Electricity Coming From at this Hour? (if I live in Ontario)

In the hour between 2:45pm and 3:45pm, thanks to nuclear power generation in Ontario, over 8,000 tonnes of CO2 was avoided. In fact, electricity currently generated by nuclear power plants in Canada saves the potential emission of approximetly 90 million tonnes of greenhouse gases per year that would result from the same amount of electricity generated by burning fossil fuels. Like, for example in Alberta where they don’t have nuclear power plants and instead rely on coal for 41% of their electricity.

Alberta Electricity Generation (As of May 24, 2011 2:30pm)