Tag Archives: Consultations

Nuclear News

Darlington New Build Passes JRP Environmental Assessment

Yesterday the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (CEAA) released a report by a federally-appointed Joint Review Panel (JRP) to evaluate the proposed new nuclear power plant at Darlington. We are proud of OPG’s extensive work and thorough studies undertaken as part of this environmental assessment (EA) process. We are especially pleased that the Panel came to the same conclusions as OPG: that Darlington New Nuclear Project will not result in any significant adverse environmental effects, given mitigation, to workers, the public or on the surrounding environment.

Public input, including the public hearings, is an integral part of the EA process. OPG’s public consultation process throughout the EA was extensive and inclusive.

The CNA was an intervener during the process and our message was clear:

  • This proposed project is a very important step in fulfilling Canada’s growing energy demands.
  • New nuclear units are an integral part of the electricity supply and consistent with the direction of the Government of Ontario’s commitment to maintaining nuclear power at 50 per cent of the province’s energy supply in the Long-Term Energy Plan.

It was great to see so much participation in the hearings by the communities, individuals and groups that took part in the public review process.

OPG has what it takes to do the job!
OPG has the necessary experience to move forward and manage a project of this magnitude. The Darlington site hosts a four-unit station that has provided safe, reliable and clean energy for 20 years with minimal environmental effect. OPG has experience successfully managing complex nuclear projects (i.e. Pickering A unit 1, Pickering units 2&3 safe storage, Pickering and Darlington Vacuum Building Outages). OPG will now thoroughly review the Panel’s report and work with our partners to implement the best solutions for the mitigation requirements set by the Panel as they await the final Government response.

Here is a link to the  Joint Review Panel summary report.

For more information about the JRP hearing, see the news release sent during the hearing about CNA’s involvement as an intervener.

Messages Nuclear News Nuclear Pride

Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI) Important Part of Managing our Legacy (Waste)

This letter appeared in the Toronto Star on June 14. It’s from a resident of Port Hope who understands that low-level radioactive waste doesn’t pose a health threat and that background radiation is as natural as breathing. That doesn’t mean that the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI) is a “scam,” as he says. The government has a responsibility to clean up its legacy nuclear waste, most of which dates back to the Cold War and is unrelated to current operations in Port Hope.

The PHAI website FAQ describes low-level waste as:

In Port Hope (Ward One), low-level radioactive waste consists of soil mixed with small amounts of historic refinery waste, left over from uranium and radium refining operations in the town during the 1930s to 1970s. This contaminated soil contains slightly elevated levels of natural radioactive materials. The Welcome and Port Granby Waste Management Facilities contain residues generated at the refinery from the 1940s to 1988. Low-level radioactive waste in the Port Hope area does not come from nuclear power reactors.

The PHAI clean-up is a process started in the late 1970s, when the issue came to light. It took until 2001 to agree on an acceptable solution. There have been hundreds of consultations with residents, government and Aboriginal groups, plus extensive  environmental and public safety assessments. In fact,

each phase of the project has been, and will continue to be, subject to regulatory review and oversight by the CNSC as well as by Environment Canada, Health Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Transport Canada and several provincial ministries.

There’s also some confusion about the Property Value Protection (PVP) Program. The Program isn’t about compensating people for having historic low-level waste on their property. The PVP Program is designed to protect the property seller if they realize a loss on the sale of their property as a direct result of the clean-up project. This is part of the 2001 agreement between the federal government and Port Hope (and Clarington).

(FYI – the PVP Program is working well with 29 of 40 claims approved since 2001.)

The bottom line: the clean-up is perfectly legitimate and will have a lasting postive impact on the community. Residents of Port Hope have expressed concern about the low-level waste, the government has responded. As an industry we support the Port Hope Area Initiative because of our commitment to public safety and environmental stewardship which includes the safe, secure and responsible management of nuclear waste — from low-level waste  to used nuclear fuel from power plants. Learn about the different types of waste and how it’s managed here.

You can sign up for email updates about PHAI on their website.