Tag Archives: Denise Carpenter

CNA2012 Nuclear Energy Nuclear News Nuclear Outreach Nuclear Pride

Canada’s Nuclear Industry Aligned for Growth in 2012

February 24, 2012 – Ottawa, Ontario

Canada’s nuclear industry is poised for future growth and prosperity, according to discussions at the Canadian Nuclear Association (CNA) Annual Conference and Trade Show in Ottawa.

Canada’s nuclear industry is as strong as ever,” said Denise Carpenter, President and Chief Executive Officer, CNA. “Over the past few days, we have had great discussions on how our industry is leveraging lessons learned from Fukushima and how innovations in research and technology can improve and grow nuclear in Canada and abroad.”

More than 650 delegates from the nuclear community attended the conference, themed ‘Leadership Through Innovation.’

Tom Mitchell, President and Chief Executive Officer, Ontario Power Generation (OPG), provided an overview of the progress made by the World Association of Nuclear Operators Fukushima Response Commission and discussed groundbreaking methods of communicating risk and nuclear safety. (Download the PDF of Tom’s speech here)

“We are not ignoring the lessons we learned from Fukushima,” said Mitchell. “Safety, despite our industry’s excellent track record, can never be taken for granted.”

OPG has almost a dozen Fukushima-related projects underway or planned for implementation between now and the end of 2016.

Underscoring the industry’s growth, the Honourable Rob Norris, Saskatchewan’s Minister Responsible for Innovation, announced a multi-year agreement to provide funding for the new $30 million Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation.

Other conference highlights included a keynote speech by Patrick Lamarre on the future opportunities for SNC-Lavalin Nuclear following their recent acquisition of the CANDU Reactor Division of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, and the presentation of the annual Ian McRae Award to Mr. Gerald (Jerry) Grandey, former Chief Executive Officer of Cameco Corporation.

Conference highlights, including links to videos from speaker sessions, can be found on Twitter by following @TalkNUclear and #cnagm2012.

(Update: check out #cnagm2012 photo highlights on our Google+ page)

Messages Nuclear News Nuclear Pride

Canadian Nuclear Association Applauds Canada-China Agreement on Uranium Exports

Prime Minister Harper’s recent visit to China proved positive for Canada’s nuclear industry. We released this statement today.

Canadian Nuclear Association Applauds Canada-China Agreement on Uranium Exports

February 9, 2012 – Ottawa, ON – Canada’s nuclear industry congratulates Prime Minister Harper on the successful completion of negotiations between Canada and China to formalize an agreement that will increase exports of Canadian uranium.

“This is good news for Canada’s nuclear industry,” said Denise Carpenter, President and CEO of the Canadian Nuclear Association. “Canada produces 18% of all global uranium, making us the second largest producer in the world. Our uranium industry employs about 14,000 people across Canada and is the leading employer of Aboriginal people in Saskatchewan.”

The broadening of the Canada-China Nuclear Cooperation Agreement means hundreds of new jobs and billions in new investments in Canada, and greater security of nuclear fuel supply for China. The Canada-China Memorandum of Understanding on Energy Cooperation strengthens bilateral ties between the two countries and provides a framework for Canada to engage China on nuclear energy policy, trade, investment, and research and development.

In addition to large uranium deposits, Canada is also home to the world’s largest commercial uranium refining facility (Blind River, Ontario) owned and operated by Cameco Corporation. The company’s planned increase in annual uranium production aligns well with China’s ambitious nuclear growth plan.

“This agreement between Canada and China will generate even more jobs and revenue in Canada, and contribute to the use of clean energy in China, which is the world’s largest energy consumer,” added Ms. Carpenter. “We encourage the Government of Canada to finalize the Protocol as quickly as possible to benefit Canada’s economy and improve access to markets for Canada’s nuclear energy resources.”

Canada’s nuclear industry generates approximately $6.6 billion per year, contributing $1.5 billion in tax revenue and $1.2 billion in export revenues. The industry also supports over 70,000 direct and indirect jobs.

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For more information:
Kathleen Olson
Director of Communications
Canadian Nuclear Association
olsonk@cna.ca

CNA Responds Messages

Natural Resource Projects will Require More than $500-Billion from Government

This letter from our President, Denise Carpenter, appeared in The Hill Times today in response to this article in the Hill Times Resources Policy Briefing on December 5. Canada’s energy and natural resources infrastructure need government investment and streamlined regulatory frameworks and would benefit greatly from enhanced collaboration between government and industry.

***

The Canadian Nuclear Association was among the industry associations that appeared before the House of Commons Environment Committee recently to advocate for changes to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA) (“NRCan anticipates $500 billion in new investments in natural resources projects,” December 5).

In fact, we made a number of suggestions that the nuclear industry believes would make environmental assessments:

  • More efficient – by conducting EAs according to the principle of “one project, one assessment, by the best-placed regulator”;
  • More effective – by strengthening the precedent value of EAs;
  • Proportionate to the environmental risk – avoiding reassessment of risks that have already been addressed;
  • More aligned with permitting and authorization decisions; and
  • More timely.

As vital as improving the regulatory framework may be, an anticipated $500 billion in natural resource projects will require much more than this from Canadian governments.

Your article rightly quoted the petroleum industry on the need for pipeline expansion.  But realizing all of these energy and natural resource developments will depend on a range of goods and services that will not be adequately supplied by business alone, and are fertile ground for public-private collaboration:

  • Education and human resource development:  public schooling and an academic sector that build the skills employers need.
  • Science and technology infrastructure:  laboratory facilities, equipment, instrumentation and expertise that can be invested in, and accessed, by business, government and universities.
  • Transport infrastructure:  the capacity to move supplies, energy, people and products efficiently within Canada and across our borders.

Senators Angus and Mitchell made related points in the same issue (“Energy, Environment:  We Need a National Discussion”).  Government can enable hundreds of billions in development, not just by regulating well, but also by working together with industry to build the human, technological and transport infrastructure required.

Sincerely,

Denise Carpenter
President
Canadian Nuclear Association

Messages Nuclear Outreach

Peterborough’s Nuclear Cluster

On November 23,  members of a potential “nuclear cluster” gathered to discuss business opportunities in the Peterborough area’s energy sector. Our President and CEO, Denise Carpenter, was joined on the panel by two CNA members, the Organization of CANDU Industries and GE Hitachi, and others.

The Canadian nuclear industry is a $6.6 billion per year industry employing over 70,000 Canadians directly or indirectly in exploring and mining uranium, generating electricity, advancing nuclear medicine, and promoting Canada’s worldwide leadership in science and technology innovation. Nuclear brings great opportunities to Canadian communities. We at TalkNUclear welcome the Peterborough “nuclear cluster” and the growth such a partnership will bring to the region.

News Release

Peterboroughs Energy Sector is Preparing for Growth Opportunities

[PETERBOROUGH] The Greater Peterborough Area Economic Development Corporation (GPA EDC) has identified Energy as a significant and growing business cluster in the area. With the arrival Lilly Lake Solar plant, current and future opportunities with hydro electricity production on the Trent-Severn waterway system, and emerging green energy technologies, the area is well-positioned to take advantage of growth in the energy sector. Interestingly, a recent study identified 25 local companies that are involved or interested in being involved in the nuclear supply chain.

The GPA EDC brought members of the local nuclear supply chain together today to enhance the cluster of businesses that will work together to grow opportunities for businesses development. The energy industry is expanding globally and new opportunities are arising that will open up our local supply chain to future growth. This work is expected to create investment and new jobs in the Greater Peterborough Area.

“A significant number of businesses in our area are already creating products that contribute to the nuclear supply chain,” stated Dan Taylor, GPA EDC President & CEO. “We’re bringing these businesses together with government support services to look at how industry changes and opportunities will create wealth and jobs for the local companies.”

The mission of the GPA EDC is to assist the City and County of Peterborough with the development of an environment that facilitates the creation of wealth and expanded employment in a manner that increases our citizens’ standard of living and improves quality of life.

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For additional information please contact Kate Young, Communications Officer,

705-743-0777 Ext. 2134 or kyoung@gpaedc.on.ca, @youngk8e, @PtboEcDev

 

BACKGROUND

The Research Project:
The 2010 Industrial Transition and Investment Project (ITI Project), funded in conjunction with the National Research Council’s (NRC) Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP), found that in the GPA there are approximately 25 local companies active or interested in being active in the nuclear industry. This major supply chain research project, conducted by the GPA EDC, focused on clean water technology, wind, and solar energy, in addition to nuclear energy in the Peterborough region.

The Nuclear Energy Industry has been defined as all activities that make up the nuclear fuel cycle: uranium mining, conversion and enrichment, power generation, the management of nuclear fuel-waste, and nuclear research and development (dealing with energy production or other uses, including medical).

Business Development Potential:
New business collaborations between existing GPA firms could lead to new business development opportunities. These collaborations are most likely to occur where GPA firms are already active in a particular element of the supply chain or are interested in becoming active in the element. The strongest levels of activity for GPA companies are within the Power Generation segment – providing products and services to nuclear power plants and their major suppliers. The opportunity for collaboration is most likely to occur in the following elements of the supply chain:

  1. Machining, Fabrication and Mechanical Equipment and Components.
  2. Calibration, Measuring and Testing Equipment, Electrical Equipment & Components and Equipment Qualification & Testing.
  3. Contracting, Project management, Engineering Services and Industrial Maintenance.
  4. Nuclear Fuel-Waste Management.

For more information about Peterborough’s expanding energy sector or to view the businesses currently active in the supply chain, please visit: http://gpaedc.on.ca/expand-develop/energy-in-the-gpa/

CNA Responds Messages Nuclear Energy

Nuclear is an Important Part of Canada’s Clean Energy Portfolio

This editorial was recently submitted to the Toronto Star. Please read and share it, and let us know what you think in the comments.

Canada is a diverse country with diverse energy needs. Yet there remains one constant: When the light switch is flipped, all Canadians expect the lights to come on.

We have important decisions before us as a country. As provinces look to phase out their reliance on coal-fired plants in favour of cleaner, lower emitting sources, we have an opportunity to invest in new generation capacity to shoulder the needs of today and tomorrow.

Effective energy policy is not about choosing some energy sources and excluding others.  Energy policy is about choosing an appropriate balance. And nuclear is an essential element in that equation.

Today, nuclear generation provides fifteen percent of the electricity produced in Canada.

Nuclear energy is a safe, affordable, and reliable form of generation. What people often overlook is that it’s also an integral part of the clean energy portfolio. Nuclear power plants produce virtually no greenhouse gas emissions, and do not contribute to either climate change or smog.

In fact, if we were to replace the electricity generated by nuclear power plants in Canada today with the same amount of electricity generated by fossil-based sources, it would add about 90 million tonnes of greenhouse emissions annually.

As we seek to reconcile our energy needs with a proactive and pragmatic approach to environmental stewardship, the benefits of nuclear power beckon.

While there is certainly a place for renewable sources such as wind and solar in the electricity supply mix, these sources are not at a point yet where they can replace more reliable, established forms of energy generation. As we all know, the sun doesn’t always shine and the wind doesn’t always blow. It would be irresponsible to rely upon intermittent generating capacity.

Our nation’s critical infrastructure relies on a consistent, predictable supply of electricity. Businesses and homes depend on cost certainty. Nuclear generating stations produce a constant, stable amount of energy. Canada’s rich supply of uranium provides security with respect to the availability and long-term price certainty of nuclear fuel.

It also provides security with respect to safety. Our stations use natural rather than enriched uranium, which is cooled with heavy water and, as a result, is much safer in the long run.

Canada’s nuclear power operations have a track record among the safest in the world. Safety is, and has always been, our number one priority. In more than 45 years of operation, not once have we experienced a significant incident, largely due to our reactors’ robust design, as well as the industry’s unwavering commitment to a “safety first” culture. As part of this commitment, we continue to look beyond our borders to experiences and lessons learned about safety around the world, in particular Japan following the Fukushima tragedy, and identify opportunities where we, as an industry, can improve.

It’s time we took a moment to consider Canada’s energy future. It’s time we make an investment in our future. It’s time to re-invest in nuclear.

Please visit www.CNA.ca and follow us on our Blog, Twitter, and Facebook to participate in our ‘TalkNUclear’ conversation.

Denise Carpenter
President and CEO
Canadian Nuclear Association

CNA Responds Messages Nuclear Energy Waste Management

CNA Responds to “Benefits of Nuclear Power Oversold”

Last week this Letter to the Editor appeared in the Saskatoon Star Phoenix. We thought we’d take a minute to respond with our own letter. Please take a read:

We have important decisions before us as a country. As provinces look to phase out their reliance on coal-fired plants in favour of cleaner, lower emitting sources, we have an opportunity to invest in new generation capacity to shoulder the needs of today and tomorrow.

Effective energy policy is not about choosing some energy sources and excluding others. Energy policy is about choosing an appropriate balance. And nuclear is an essential element in that equation.

Unlike other sources of energy, the price of nuclear is both stable and affordable. According to studies by the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development, a multi-national organization working to further growth and development, the overall cost to the consumer of nuclear power over the life of a nuclear power plant is on par with that of large-scale hydro, natural gas and coal, and much lower than wind and solar.

Not only is nuclear energy stable in price, but it’s also a stable source of energy itself. Canada’s nuclear power plants were designed to operate continuously to consistently produce a stable amount of electricity. It complements other forms of generation that operate more intermittently. Wind and solar depend on the wind blowing and the sun shining, while more established forms such as hydro and natural gas tend to run during periods of high demand.

Regarding the management of used nuclear fuel and low- and mid-level waste, our commitment to public safety and environmental stewardship includes the safe, secure and responsible long-term management of all of the used fuel produced by Canadian nuclear power plants. The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) was established in 2002 to work with industry, research and government organizations to develop a management plan. The implementation of this plan is highly monitored and regulated by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission to protect the health, safety and security of people and our environment.

Nuclear generating stations produce a constant, stable amount of energy. Canada’s rich supply of uranium, most of which is mined in Saskatchewan, provides security with respect to the availability and long-term price certainty of nuclear fuel. And generation does not contribute to atmospheric carbon emissions.

In fact, if we were to replace the electricity generated by nuclear power plants in Canada today with the same amount of electricity generated by fossil-based sources, it would add about 90 million tonnes of greenhouse emissions annually.

It’s time we took a moment to consider Canada’s energy future. In committing to nuclear, Canada will be committing to a renewable, environmentally sustainable and economically viable means of energy.

For more information on nuclear power, please visit our association’s website www.cna.ca You’re also invited to join the conversation on our TalkNuclear Twitter and Facebook pages, and our TalkNuclear blog.