Tag Archives: Government of Canada

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CNA Makes Specific Commitments on Gender Equality

In May 2018 at the Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM-9) in Copenhagen, Canada and Sweden jointly launched the “Equal by 30” campaign, which is aimed at reaching 30% representation of women in the energy sector by 2030.  Parliamentary Secretary Kim Rudd, head of the Canadian Delegation, signed on behalf of Canada. Details of the campaign, its principles and objectives, can be found at www.equalby30.org

Several CNA member companies have become signatories to “Equal by 30” in support of the endeavour and its objectives. CNA signed up in its capacity as the association representing the nuclear industry.

Next step in the “Equal by 30” process is for signatories to develop specific commitments that, once developed and communicated to the “Equal by 30” organizers, will be put on the campaign’s website. The signatory will then be encouraged to report regularly on progress made.

CNA already has a pay equity plan and has reached overall gender balance in its staffing. CNA has flexible working hours and working-from-home arrangements that help to support family-related responsibilities.

In addition, CNA is prepared to make the following commitments, bearing in mind that CNA cannot undertake commitments that are within the sole responsibility and control of its members:

  1. Encourage CNA member companies not currently signatories to the “Equal by 30” campaign to consider signing up to it;
  2. Encourage CNA member companies that are signatories to “Equal by 30” to aim for at least 30% representation of women by 2030 in company positions in which women are currently under-represented;
  3. Encourage CNA members to identify qualified women candidates for election to the CNA Board, with the aim of reaching 30% representation of women on the CNA Board by 2030;
  4. Encourage the CNA Board to nominate a senior leader to support initiatives towards a gender-diverse work environment in the nuclear sector;
  5. Undertake to promote “Equal by 30” and its principles, including facilitating the exchange of best practices and knowledge-sharing where possible within the nuclear sector; and
  6. Continue CNA’s active support of Women in Nuclear (WiN) Canada.

The “Equal by 30” campaign and corporate commitments from energy sector signatories will be a feature item of the forthcoming Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM-10), hosted by the Government of Canada in Vancouver at the end of May.

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Carr Supports Nuclear

The CNA’s ongoing dialogue and lobbying efforts with government are underpinned with the message that Canada’s nuclear sector is a strategic advantage for the nation in its capability to enable clean prosperity for all Canadians. Part of this message was reflected back from government in a recent Q&A with Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr in the Hill Times.

Carr’s reference to nuclear was particularly notable given the fact that his comments were part of a special feature in the Hill Times on climate and renewable energy.

Q: While the government has set a target for the percentage of energy it hopes to draw from renewable sources, are there any source-specific targets? For example, how much energy will be drawn from solar or wind, etc.? Also, is nuclear included as a renewable source in those calculations? If so, what do you make of arguments that until solutions are found for the safe and proper disposal of nuclear waste, it is in fact not a ‘clean’ energy source?

A: “Today, 80 per cent of our electricity comes from non-greenhouse gas-emitting sources, including nuclear energy, and our government’s goal is to put Canada on the pathway to 90 per cent, by 2030, in large part by accelerating the phasing out of coal-powered electricity.

However, power generation falls under provincial jurisdiction and it is the responsibility of the provinces to decide the best ways to green their electricity grids.
“When it comes to producing nuclear energy, waste owners are required, under federal law to implement safe solutions for their waste in both the short and long term. Pursuant to the Nuclear Safety and Control Act, all waste produced from nuclear power generation is currently safely managed at facilities licensed by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission.

“As I told the Canadian Nuclear Association earlier this year, there is no reason why nuclear energy can’t be a part of the solution. In fact, Canada is one of only nine Mission Innovation countries to include nuclear energy as part of its clean-energy portfolio.

“Why? Because the use of nuclear power throughout the world makes an important contribution to cleaner air and the mitigation of climate change. Over 22 per cent of the uranium used to generate nuclear power around the world is mined in Canada. This displaces the equivalent of between 300 and 600 million tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions every year compared to electricity that otherwise would have been generated using fossil fuels.”

mvigliotti@hilltimes.com

The Hill Times – July 17, 2017