Tag Archives: IESO

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Ontario Nuclear Sets Monthly Output Record

By Erin Polka
Communications Officer
Canadian Nuclear Association

Ontario nuclear set another monthly output record – 8.72 billion kWh for March, beating out January’s 8.46 billion kWh, and more than any other month since 2010.

 

Monthly Ontario nuclear output

 

Most likely, it’s the highest monthly output in Ontario’s history, however reliable data sources are hard to find.

According to the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO), nuclear’s output is usually highest in mid-winter and mid-summer. This is due to the increased electrical demand as a result of heating and cooling.

But March isn’t typically a high-demand month, which makes this record all the more impressive.

The more Ontario relies on nuclear energy, the fewer greenhouse gases the province releases into the atmosphere.

Over the entire lifecycle, including construction, transportation, operation and decommissioning, nuclear is one of the cleanest options available, emitting about 16 grams of CO2 per kWh. It compares favorably with hydro (4 grams), wind (12 grams) and solar (46 grams), and is a vast improvement over gas (469 grams).

This past March, gas only contributed 1.09 billion kWh, which is less than usual, and translates into less air pollution.

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Nuclear Provides 62% of Ontario’s Electricity

Nuclear power generated 62 per cent of Ontario’s electricity for the year of 2014, recently released data shows.

The Independent Electrical System Operator (IESO) bought 94.9 terawatt hours of electricity from nuclear generators in 2014. That’s 62 percent of electricity delivered through Ontario’s grid, up from 59 per cent in 2013.

Energy output by fuel type

Better yet – the nuclear power industry delivered all this electricity at roughly six cents per kilowatt-hour. That’s well below the average price paid by Ontario consumers of 8.5 cents.

In just six years, nuclear has increased to 63 per cent from 53 per cent in 2008, according to the IESO.

This confirms the wisdom of Ontario’s strategic investment in nuclear energy and shows its enduring benefits.

Nuclear power continues to provide Ontario with safe, reliable, and carbon-free electricity at a price well below the rates set in Ontario’s regulated-price plan. The province’s nuclear electricity providers – Ontario Power Generation Inc. and Bruce Power – received approximately six cents per kilowatt hour in 2014.

In addition to affordable electricity, the nuclear industry provided significant economic benefits to Ontario through thousands of durable, high-paying jobs. According to Canada’s Manufacturers and Exporters, the nuclear industry employs about 60,000 people directly and in its supply chains.

Rejuvenating ten of Ontario’s 18 nuclear reactors would add thousands more jobs between 2016 and 2031.