Tag Archives: Independent Electricity System Operator

CNA Responds

CNA response to a Montreal Gazette op-ed by Jack Gibbons of the Ontario Clean Air Alliance

Re: “Quebec and Ontario have much to gain from energy co-operation” (Montreal Gazette, December 4), by Jack Gibbons of the Ontario Clean Air Alliance.

Jack Gibbons argues in his letter that Ontario should purchase hydro power from Quebec to replace the 60 per cent of its power generated by nuclear energy.

In 2017, Ontario’s Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) looked at the electrical interconnections between Ontario and Quebec. It found the maximum potential of reliable import capability from Quebec into Ontario is 2,050 MW, or approximately 15% of Ontario’s installed nuclear generating capacity.

According to the IESO, importing this amount would require five to seven years of upgrades to Ontario’s transmission system at a cost of at least $220 million. Any more hydro imports would require the construction of new interties at a cost of up to $1.4 billion, additional transmission infrastructure in both provinces, and take up to 10 years to complete.

Ontario’s nuclear plants produce electricity safely and reliably, every day, around the clock at 30% less than the average cost to generate power. Refurbishing Ontario’s nuclear reactors will extend their lives for decades, provide a cost-effective, long-term supply of clean electricity, create thousands of jobs within the province and generate lifesaving medical isotopes in the process.

John Barrett
President and CEO
Canadian Nuclear Association
Ottawa, ON

Uncategorized

Ontario Nuclear Sets Monthly Output Record

By Erin Polka
Communications Officer
Canadian Nuclear Association

Ontario nuclear set another monthly output record – 8.72 billion kWh for March, beating out January’s 8.46 billion kWh, and more than any other month since 2010.

 

Monthly Ontario nuclear output

 

Most likely, it’s the highest monthly output in Ontario’s history, however reliable data sources are hard to find.

According to the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO), nuclear’s output is usually highest in mid-winter and mid-summer. This is due to the increased electrical demand as a result of heating and cooling.

But March isn’t typically a high-demand month, which makes this record all the more impressive.

The more Ontario relies on nuclear energy, the fewer greenhouse gases the province releases into the atmosphere.

Over the entire lifecycle, including construction, transportation, operation and decommissioning, nuclear is one of the cleanest options available, emitting about 16 grams of CO2 per kWh. It compares favorably with hydro (4 grams), wind (12 grams) and solar (46 grams), and is a vast improvement over gas (469 grams).

This past March, gas only contributed 1.09 billion kWh, which is less than usual, and translates into less air pollution.