Tag Archives: Nuclear Energy

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CNA response to CBC story on SMR’s in Saskatchewan

Re Viable alternative’ or ‘greenwashing?’: Sask. experts divided on nuclear power

In your May 24 story, Jim Harding says Saskatchewan’s electricity grid is small enough to be powered by wind and solar.

While Saskatchewan has some of the best wind and solar resources in the country, there are limitations as to when these technologies produce electricity as well as how much can be accommodated on any one electricity system (regardless of the size of the grid). As a result, the way to create more “space” for renewables is to pair them appropriately with power that’s available 24 / 7.

As a result, the real question should be—what is the best mix of electricity for Saskatchewan?

The Government of Saskatchewan is considering new nuclear—specifically Small Modular Reactors (SMRs)—because the province has some of the world’s best uranium resources.

They are considering it because they know it works reliably and cleanly, and it generates great jobs.

Lastly, while giving credit for nuclear not emitting carbon when producing electricity, Mr. Harding claims that nuclear energy’s life-cycle emissions detract from this.

The fact is, all forms of electricity production emit some amount of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, even if they don’t burn fossil fuels.

Though nuclear energy does have an intensive life-cycle, from mining of uranium ore to storage of spent fuel, it releases no carbon in its operations. When all of these steps are taken into account, nuclear power still compares favourably with renewable energy sources – and is well ahead of fossil fuels.

According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, nuclear power sits alongside renewables such as wind and hydro as electricity sources with lifetime carbon emissions of under or about 20 grams per kilowatt-hour (g/kWh).

Saskatchewan is blessed with abundant solar, wind and uranium resources. The best mix of technologies to decarbonize its electricity system is abundantly clear.

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Millennials concerned about climate change, support new nuclear

By John Barrett, President and CEO, Canadian Nuclear Association
Originally published in QP Briefing, February 26, 2019

This Wednesday, the Canadian Nuclear Association kicks off its 2019 Conference and Trade Show at the Westin Hotel in Ottawa.

The theme of CNA2019 is: “New Nuclear: Generating Solutions for Climate and Health.” Over 800 attendees will talk about the innovations in nuclear technology – and how that makes the future of nuclear energy so different from the past.

There is growing evidence that the millennial generation evaluates and supports innovative technologies more strongly when they are seen to bring real solutions to society’s challenges. First and foremost among the solutions is whether the technology can significantly reduce GHG emissions and help decarbonize our energy supply.

This is where new nuclear comes in. The nuclear industry is undergoing a renaissance in innovative solutions that hold the promise of lifting communities out of energy poverty or coal dependence, while enhancing public health through clean air and medical isotopes. Small, ultra-safe reactors could hold the key to significant reductions in GHG emissions, while providing copious amount of clean electricity to communities and industries alike.

In advance of CNA2019, the independent firm Abacus Data was commissioned to measure the views of young Canadians on climate change and the role that nuclear and small modular reactors (SMRs) may play in reducing emissions.

The findings of the online poll* will be presented by Abacus Data CEO David Coletto at a keynote address at the conference on February 28. But here in advance are some of the highlights.

  • Young people were the most concerned about climate change. Sixty-two per cent of those 18-to-29 in age said they were extremely or very concerned about the issue, compared with 54 per cent nationally.
  • Those 18-to-29 were also more likely to say a shift from fossil fuels to low-carbon energy sources was extremely or very important – 69 per cent, compared with 58 per cent for the general population.
  • While the 18-to-29 age group was most likely to believe that nuclear energy created more carbon pollution than oil, they were strongly in support of nuclear replacing higher emitting energy sources after being informed that nuclear was a low-carbon technology.
  • Eighty-nine per cent of those 18-to-29 supported or were open to using nuclear in this scenario, compared to 83 per cent of the overall population.
  • The poll also found that 86 per cent of those 18-to-29 supported or were open to SMRs as an alternative to fossil fuels.

Most importantly, the data shows that when young people, who are most concerned about climate change, are informed that nuclear and new nuclear are low-carbon sources, they quickly become strong supporters.

Canada is home to new nuclear. The innovation is happening throughout the nuclear industry.

It is happening in advanced reactor design, refurbishment of our CANDU fleet, development and use of robotics and 3D printing and artificial intelligence, development of alternative clean power sources such as hydrogen that can be generated through nuclear power.

Canada is emerging internationally as a leading country for the research, development and regulation of small modular reactors, which offer to small and remote communities the possibility, hitherto beyond reach, of unlimited, reliable clean electricity and heat on a 24/7 basis.

All this tells us that new nuclear is not a dream. It’s not around the corner. It’s here now. Come to CNA2019 and see for yourself!

*The survey was conducted online with 2,500 Canadians aged 18+ in February 2019. The margin of error for a comparable probability-based random sample is +/- 1.96 per cent, 19 times out of 20. The data were weighted according to census to ensure sample matched Canada’s population according to age, gender, education, region.

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99 uses for nuclear technology

  1. Producing clean energy
  2. Medical diagnostic procedures
  3. Radiation therapy
  4. Sterilizing medical equipment
  5. Killing bacteria, insects and parasites that cause food-borne diseases
  6. Delaying fruits and vegetables from ripening
  7. Inhibiting root vegetables from sprouting
  8. Halting meat and seafood from spoiling
  9. Producing new crop varieties
  10. Producing hardier crops
  11. The Sterile Insect Technique (SIT)
  12. Preventing the spread of infectious diseases such as Ebola, malaria and Zika
  13. Decontaminating spices
  14. Improving livestock health
  15. Improving water and fertilizer management
  16. Determining nutrient absorption rates
  17. Verifying the integrity of aircraft components
  18. Improving the reliability of automotive engines
  19. Increasing the compatibility of pacemakers with the human body
  20. Developing better delivery systems for pharmaceuticals
  21. Checking welds of gas and oil pipelines
  22. Analyzing the walls of dug holes
  23. Identifying mineral deposits
  24. Searching for underground caves or formations
  25. Verifying the integrity of roads and bridges
  26. Optimizing road life, rutting resistance and overall durability
  27. Producing safe drinking water
  28. Powering space missions
  29. Powering navigation beacons and satellites
  30. Powering ships and submarines
  31. Producing hydrogen
  32. Smoke detectors
  33. Sterilizing cosmetics and hair products
  34. Sterilizing contact lens solution
  35. Producing non-stick frying pans
  36. Preventing static build-up in photocopiers
  37. Making watches and clocks that “glow in the dark”
  38. Emergency exit signs
  39. Compact fluorescent light bulbs
  40. Increasing computer disk memory
  41. Golf balls with longer drives
  42. Lantern mantles
  43. Combating malnutrition
  44. Combating childhood obesity
  45. Analyzing metals, alloys and electronic materials
  46. Identifying extremely small and diluted forensic materials
  47. Characterizing archaeological and historical materials
  48. Carbon dating the age of rocks and organic materials
  49. Studying air pollution and aerosols
  50. Determining the origin, age and distribution of groundwater
  51. Assessing the interconnections between groundwater and surface water
  52. Understanding aquifer recharge systems
  53. Evaluating leakages through dams and irrigation channels
  54. Lake and reservoir dynamics
  55. Calculating flow and sedimentation rates
  56. Analyzing river discharges
  57. Measuring soil moisture
  58. Measuring magnitudes and sources of soil erosion
  59. Detecting and analyzing environmental pollutants
  60. Studying the mixing and flow rates of industrial material
  61. Locating leaks
  62. Measuring industrial equipment wear rates
  63. Thickness gauges for sheet material
  64. Density gauges for control of liquids, powders and solids
  65. Gauges to determine flow, level and weight
  66. X-ray fluorescent analyzers
  67. Gas chromatographs
  68. Instrument calibrators
  69. Krypton leak detectors
  70. Well logging
  71. Locating materials embedded inside others
  72. Detecting corrosion and moisture damage
  73. Measuring blood or plasma volume
  74. Quantifying bone mass
  75. Detecting changes in bone metabolism
  76. Assessing the blood flow to the brain
  77. Looking for hydrocephalus
  78. Diagnosing and following the progression of tumors or infections
  79. Evaluating how well food travels from the stomach to the intestines
  80. Finding bleeding sites within the abdomen
  81. Identifying gall bladder obstructions
  82. Evaluating the effectiveness of a perito-venous shunt
  83. Finding benign liver tumors
  84. Diagnosing cirrhosis, hepatitis, tumors and other digestive tract problems
  85. Finding blood clots in the lungs
  86. Detecting Meckel’s Diverticulum
  87. Detecting adrenal tumors or pheochromocytoma
  88. Detecting coronary artery disease
  89. Locating neuroendocrine tumors
  90. Evaluating a possible parathyroid adenoma
  91. Diagnosing stomach ulcers
  92. Studying kidney function
  93. Studying gland function
  94. Showing the direction of lymphatic drainage from cancer sites
  95. Checking for tear duct blockages
  96. Diagnosing conditions affecting the testicles
  97. Studying thyroid function
  98. Detailing the heart’s ability to pump blood
  99. Diagnosing ischemic bowel disease
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A Carbon Tax Isn’t Enough — Canada Needs More Nuclear

By John Barrett, President and CEO, Canadian Nuclear Association
Originally published in the National Post, December 18, 2018

Today, the big federal-provincial debate centres around Ottawa’s plan to introduce a carbon tax. Changes in provincial governments have brought premiers into office who are openly opposed to Ottawa’s plan. But, as a country, are we becoming too wrapped up in one specific policy to combat climate change?

Climate change mitigation cannot be successful through carbon pricing alone. By only focusing on this we are losing sight of the importance of ramping up our clean electricity capacity.

Global emissions continue to increase at a rapid pace and most G20 countries are not on track to meet their Paris commitments, according to a recent report by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). The sheer amount of clean electricity needed to meet future demand and help end energy poverty in the developing world will take all available generating sources.

Standing above all other options in sheer capacity to generate large quantities of clean electricity is nuclear energy. It is a solution that is proven and available now.

Greater progress required for a cleaner future

Canada’s nuclear reactor technology and uranium exports have contributed globally to the avoidance of millions of tonnes of CO2 over the last 30 years, by displacing fossil fuel sources.

Today, nuclear energy produces approximately 15 per cent of Canada’s electricity. In Ontario, it provides 60 per cent of the province’s electricity, and in New Brunswick, it provides 30 per cent.

Ontario is justly proud of phasing out coal generation. Contrary to what some people would have us believe, this was not due to variable renewable energy sources such as wind and solar coming online, but rather the refurbishment and subsequent coming online of Bruce Power nuclear reactors that made the end of coal a reality.

Last year, Sweden generated a whopping 95 per cent of its total electricity from zero-carbon sources, with 42 and 41 per cent coming from nuclear and hydroelectric power, respectively. France generated 88 per cent of its electricity from zero-carbon sources, with 72 and 10 per cent coming from nuclear and hydro sources. In both countries, the establishment of a fleet of nuclear power reactors during the 1970s and 1980s effectively decarbonized their electricity supply.

A plan for Canada and the world

While the contributions of wind and solar continue to climb, they cannot solve the immediate need. As they produce energy intermittently, they can’t run 24/7 and require backup generation, usually through fossil fuel sources, which add to GHG emissions.

By contrast, there is growing consensus for the need to ramp up nuclear. In April of 2014, the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recommended tripling the amount of energy use from nuclear and renewable sources to keep climate change within two degrees Celsius.

Furthermore, Canada’s Mid-Century Long-Term Low-Greenhouse Gas Development Strategy, released at COP22, included nuclear in all the models it espoused for achieving drastic GHG emission reductions by 2050.

The nuclear industry has innovative new reactor technologies under development. They are distinguished by their smaller size, lower costs, and diverse applications, from powering off-grid communities to heavy industrial processes to hydrogen production. This is what we call the new nuclear – and it’s on its way.

By using today’s proven nuclear power and tomorrow’s new nuclear, we have a chance in Canada to actually meet our GHG reduction targets and claim real leadership in the transition to a low-carbon future.

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QP Briefing ads show nuclear is good for Ontario

Ad #1 online throughout July 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ad #2 online throughout September 2018.

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Hill Times ads promote the benefits of nuclear in Canada

Ad #1 published in the “Energy” brief on August 13, 2018.

Ad #2 published in the “Innovation” brief on October 1, 2018.

Ad #3 published in the “Energy” brief on December 3, 2018.