Tag Archives: Nuclear Industry

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Nuclear Advocates Unite for Nuclear Hill Day in Ottawa

By Matthew Mairinger, Senior Advisor Stakeholder Relations, Ontario Power Generation
Originally published at naygn.org, November 16, 2018

On October 28th and October 29th North American Young Generation in Nuclear (NAYGN), Women in Nuclear (WiN), Canadian Nuclear Workers Council, and industry representatives came together for the Canadian Nuclear Association’s (CNA) Nuclear Hill Day in Ottawa, Ontario. Sunday included a discussion of the overview of the political climate in Ottawa as well as an overview of important bills currently in senate such as bill C-68 and bill C-69.

October 29th had a full agenda with 13 teams assembled with 3-4 members on a team. Each team would visit with MPs/ministers/senators from all political parties with the goal of informing the politicians about nuclear power and sharing the passion the individuals have in the industry. There were six representatives from North American Young Generation in Nuclear from the Bruce Power, UOIT, Mississauga, Durham and Chalk River chapter.

Matthew Mairinger, NAYGN Canadian Affairs Chair, stated that “It was great to participate in the nuclear hill day organized by CNA and have the opportunity to share the opinions of young professionals with politicians. The largest hurdle for nuclear acceptance is education, so speaking directly with policy makers is a great stride forward to ensure that clean energy through nuclear is part of Canada’s long term energy future.”

Dan Arnold, Mina Shinouda, Matthew Mairinger, Osama Baig and Owen Marshall-Glew

Justin Hannah, Director Marketing, Strategy & External Relations – SNC-Lavalin; the Honourable Lisa Raitt, Milton MP; Matthew Mairinger, NAYGN Canadian Affairs Chair & Senior Advisor Stakeholder Relations – OPG; Jennifer Rowe, SVP Corporate Affairs – OPG; Mike Glade, LVP Bruce – Society of United Professionals

David Shier – National Director Canadian Nuclear Workers Council; Katherine Ward – VP Communications, SNC-Lavalin; Senator David Adams Richards; Alanna Favretto, NAYGN Bruce member

Mina Shinouda, NAYGN Mississauga member; Dave Van Kestern, Chatham-Kent—Leamington MP; Andrew Thiele, Strategist, Government & Stakeholder Relations – Bruce Power; Rebecca Caron, Society of United Professionals unit director

Alanna Favretto, a NAYGN Bruce member, stated that “participating in the CNA hill day was very rewarding.  Informing government stakeholders on the nuclear industry, especially challenging stereotypes and myths about the industry, was an amazing opportunity.  The day also provided the chance to learn from senior industry leaders and provided me with experiences and ideas that I will take back and share with the NAYGN Bruce Chapter.”

Osama Baig, former NAYGN UOIT president, stated “CNA’s Hill Day arranged a platform to discuss with Members of Parliament Canada’s Nuclear industry and its contributions towards fighting climate change, supplying lifesaving radioisotopes to millions worldwide, trailblazing progressive SMR technology and facilitating NAYGN’s role in sparking a  nuclear renaissance.”

Dan Arnold, NAYGN Chalk River advocacy & activism co-chair, stated “through the cooperation of many NAYGN chapters, WiN, Industry, Labour and of course CNA I enjoyed a tremendous day learning from amazing nuclear professionals while making a positive lasting impression about nuclear on our elected officials.”

Mina Shinouda, NAYGN Mississauga member, stated “It was an insightful experience being part of CNA’s Hill day representing NAYGN in interacting with industry stakeholders and making our voices heard.”

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Nuclear: A Part of Canada’s Energy Transition

The Generation Energy Council Report released last month is an important milestone in the continuous dialogue that must occur around energy innovation at the federal level. The Report highlights the importance of swift yet thoughtful decarbonization and proposes strategies to achieve the low-carbon future we all want.

The Canadian nuclear industry fully supports the spirit of the Report, and much of the advice. However, the industry would like to emphasize the greater role that nuclear energy can have in leading the energy transition.

Below are four ways in which nuclear can contribute to an energy future that is affordable, reliable and clean.

1) Small modular reactors for resource extraction, energy to remote communities and grid power

Small modular reactors (SMRs) have a smaller electrical capacity than most current power reactors, anywhere from 1-300 MW, and are modular in both construction and deployment.

SMRs are perfectly suited for on- and off-grid resource extraction, such as Canada’s oil sands operations and Ring of Fire mining. Substituting nuclear-generated heat into these processes would reduce greenhouse gases and conserve our natural gas wealth for higher-value uses.

SMRs also hold great potential for regions that currently rely on dirty diesel fuel, such as Canada’s remote and off-grid communities. Not only could SMRs provide clean energy to these communities, it could in many instances alleviate energy poverty.

Canada is already recognized internationally as a favourable market and regulatory environment for SMRs. Establishing a leadership position early would enable Canada to secure a significant share of the projected $400-600 billion global market for SMR technology.

2) Nuclear energy to produce hydrogen for fuel and energy storage

Not only can nuclear energy provide clean heat and electricity, it can also be used to produce hydrogen. Technologies that employ hydrogen as fuel or for energy storage are well established in Canada. Hydrogen-powered vehicles are on the rise, but unless the hydrogen is produced using clean energy sources like nuclear, they risk being just as polluting as gas-powered vehicles.

The comprehensive Trottier Energy Futures Project of the Canadian Academy of Engineering lays out in stark terms the magnitude of the challenge of decarbonization and concludes that to meet the government’s 2050 targets will require a massive increase in electrification of energy supply through a diverse set of low-carbon technologies, including nuclear.

3) New nuclear power reactors for on-grid power

The use of nuclear energy has allowed Canada to achieve a mostly clean energy portfolio. Nuclear energy is the largest source of clean energy after hydro, providing approximately 15% of Canada’s electricity, and 60% of Ontario’s electricity. Between 2005 and 2015, nuclear energy enabled Ontario to completely phase out coal, improving air quality and reducing respiratory illnesses and deaths.

Additional nuclear reactors could provide the same clean air benefits to other provinces that currently burn large amounts of fossil fuels, such as Alberta, Saskatchewan, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

As well as being a clean energy option, grid-based nuclear is affordable and reliable. In Ontario, only hydro is more affordable. Wind is about twice as expensive as nuclear, and solar is more than six times as expensive.

Nuclear generating stations are also extremely reliable, producing electricity day and night, regardless of the weather.

4) Social and economic advantages of a strong nuclear industry in Canada

Through clean nuclear energy generation in Ontario (60%) and New Brunswick (30%), radioisotope production for nuclear diagnoses and therapy, and numerous other technology applications throughout the country, the Canadian nuclear industry is an undeniable source of revenue, jobs and economic prosperity.

The nuclear industry employs 60,000 Canadians directly and indirectly. Careers in the nuclear industry offer challenging work, competitive salaries and benefits, and opportunities for advancement. Because many of the jobs require highly developed skills and advanced education, the nuclear industry offers a homegrown job market for skilled graduates and attracts international talent to Canada.

The nuclear industry is also in the process of refurbishing 10 of its reactors so that they can continue to provide another 30 to 40 years of clean, reliable electricity. The refurbishments are currently Canada’s largest infrastructure projects, and are progressing on time and on budget.

About Vision 2050: Canada’s Nuclear Advantage

The nuclear industry has developed a vision of nuclear technology’s role in Canada’s clean energy future. The vision (cna.ca/vision2050) describes how Canada can become a world leader in producing clean, reliable energy for all Canadians, while stimulating the economy and creating jobs. It also explains how nuclear and renewable energy can work hand-in-glove to tackle climate change. Most importantly, it sets out a pathway of partnership between industry and government which would help Canada achieve its energy policy goals.

About the Canadian Nuclear Association

Since 1960, the Canadian Nuclear Association (CNA) has been the national voice of the Canadian nuclear industry. Working alongside our members and all communities of interest, the CNA promotes the industry nationally and internationally, works with governments on policies affecting the sector and works to increase awareness and understanding of the value nuclear technology brings to the environment, economy and the daily life of Canadians.

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The CNA Key Messages App is Here!

app-imageWe have an app!

The CNA has created a mobile app where users can access all of the key messages for the Canadian nuclear industry.

The free, user-friendly app features key messages around popular nuclear-related topics, along with well-documented proof-points.

Originally designed with CNA members in mind, this app can be used by anyone to explain and justify the use of nuclear technology in Canada and worldwide.

The app can be accessed by searching in the App Store (iPhone) or Google Play (Android) using appropriate keywords or by following these links:

We are very excited about this new digital addition to our collateral, and encourage you to share the news with your friends and colleagues.

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Young People with Passion – That is the Future of Nuclear Power

By Milt Caplan
President
MZConsulting Inc.

Originally posted at http://mzconsultinginc.com/.

We talk a lot about the merits of nuclear power in this blog. From economics and reliability to environment, we focus on why nuclear is now and should be an essential part of our future energy mix. But how do we get there? Again, we often talk about the challenges associated with public acceptance and how we can better position nuclear as the energy solution we all know it is.

But today we want to focus on something different. People. We have been privileged to work in this industry for more than 35 years. Often it’s hard to believe that this much time has passed since we were so excited to start our first jobs as a young engineers working on nuclear safety. Over the years there have been many challenges as the industry slowed, in part due to the accident at Chernobyl, in part due to the slowdown in energy demand growth in many industrialized countries, to the challenges of building capital intensive large projects into deregulated markets. But one thing has not changed; our passion for the industry – our passion for making the world a better place with clean reliable economic nuclear power. And we are not alone.

At a recent industry event, I spoke to many of our colleagues, many of whom have come out of retirement again and again simply because their passion for nuclear power as a solution to meeting our ever growing energy needs is simply impossible to extinguish. Some are well into their 70s and their enthusiasm is as strong as when they were in their 30s.

With nuclear power growing once again, it is time to ensure its continuity by instilling this passion into a new generation of young people. It is the fuel that will ensure the industry continues to be innovative and reaches its full potential going forward. That being said it is important to focus on what is important to this new generation of engineers and scientists; what will keep them enthused and committed. It is hard to imagine millennials thinking of utilities or large industrial companies as the growth companies of the future. Rather they think of companies like Google, Facebook and Uber when it comes to large innovative exciting companies – or they believe in being entrepreneurs and starting their own tech start-up. This ad campaign by GE (one example below) is a brilliant one as it tries to show young people that it can indeed be exciting to be in this large industrial company – that not everyone has to be coding and developing the next app that puts hats on cats – but that to truly change the world, it is the future of things like transportation and energy that really matters.

I love it (There are a series of these ads, just go to YouTube and you can see more).

In the nuclear industry we have the problem of a gap in age. There are many people in their 50s through to retirement age that have been in the industry for decades, and then there is a new cohort of young people who have joined the industry in the last 10 years or less. This new young cohort has different work expectations than the older group. They expect to be able to find a place and make a meaningful contribution in a relatively short time. They are impatient and expect to change jobs many times in their career. They do not expect to join one company and stay there until they retire.

Yet we are an industry that believes that it takes years to learn and become an expert. We need people with 10 years plus experience and we need experts who continue to grow as they gain the experience needed to make a difference.

Therefore, as industry leaders we need to understand and address the desires and concerns of those just starting out. We need to remember that 30 years ago when we were younger we quickly developed into experts as new techniques were established and we did not have the benefit of people like us to show us the ropes. We were at the leading edge and we loved working in this exciting young industry. We learned on the job. We were excited with every opportunity and put our best into developing a product that we strongly believed in. These are the conditions we need to replicate for this next generation. We need to ensure they are actively engaged, play a strong role in new projects and in innovating as the industry moves forward. We need to provide them with the opportunities they crave to develop their passion for this exciting industry. Competition for these people will be fierce and we need to show that the nuclear industry is where they can truly make a difference in the world.

Sometimes as conservative engineers, or as some of the anti-nuclear activists may state – that it is not fair to leave problems for future generations to solve; we need to push back. As one quite learned colleague once said, why solve every issue – we need to leave some things for the bright young people following us to solve – because they will be smarter than we are and bring new thinking to old issues.

While many think the future of nuclear power depends on public acceptance, or solving the waste issue, or improving nuclear safety; it actually depends on building a passionate next generation of young people to take it in directions that none of us has even thought of yet. Life is about passion – so let’s all work to bring out the passion in a new generation of nuclear people. The future is open to us – but only if we can attract the best and brightest people needed to make it happen.

If you are under 40 and have read this post – please comment explaining why you are passionate about working in the nuclear industry.

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Why am I so Proud to Work in the Canadian Nuclear Industry?

By John Stewart
Director of Policy and Research
Canadian Nuclear Association

Because my industry develops one of humanity’s most sophisticated, promising, and cleanest technologies, for human and environmental good.

Because labour unions in this industry believe as strongly in nuclear energy as I do, and advocate for it as strongly as I do.

Because leading environmentalists advocate for it as well.

Because my industry’s membership is united, not by a business model, but by this technology.  We are universities, laboratories, utilities, engineering and construction firms, standards and training organizations and a global mining company, working together to build a better future.

Because my country, Canada, is a world leader in nuclear technology.

It’s easy to be proud of this.

CNA2014

Durham MP Erin O’Toole Congratulates CNA and Canadian Nuclear Industry in House of Commons

In the House of Commons Friday, Conservative MP Erin O’Toole (Durham) congratulated the CNA on its recent successful 2014 conference and trade show and spoke about Canada’s nuclear industry.

“Canada has long been in a leader in nuclear science and industry,” he said. “Our technology and expertise has been sought after around the world.”

Stay tuned to this blog for videos of speakers and panel discussions from CNA2014.