Tag Archives: Nuclear Waste Management Organization

CNA2019

Environmental Impact and Climate Change Targets Panel at CNA2019

Top to bottom: Steve Aplin, Andrew Rowe, Laurie Swami

On Thursday, February 28, at 3:30 p.m., Steve Aplin, Andrew Rowe and Laurie Swami, will gather onstage at CNA2019 to discuss new nuclear, environmental impacts and climate change targets.

Our governments promise evidence-based approaches to policy. Nowhere is such an approach more needed than in the analysis of climate change impacts and GHG reduction. How to temper high-flown aspiration with hard data and engineering? New Nuclear aims to make a real contribution to the low-carbon economy, while protecting the environment. Can we find new ways to engage communities on science-based solutions and gain their support?

Steve Aplin is data strategist at emissionTrak. He has launched and led energy- and environment-related projects dealing with current and future energy production and use at the macro and micro levels. In addition to the technical, technological, and organizational aspects, all these projects involve also a political dimension, which often necessitates advocacy at various levels of government as well as in the public arena.

Andrew Rowe is the director of the Institute for Integrated Energy Systems, and professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, at the University of Victoria. He is a principal investigator with the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions’ 2060 Project examining decarbonization of Canada’s energy system.

Laurie Swami is President and CEO of the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO). She was appointed to the role in 2016 and is responsible for implementing Canada’s plan for the long-term management of used nuclear fuel. Ms. Swami previously served as Senior Vice-President of Decommissioning and Nuclear Waste Management at Ontario Power Generation (OPG). She holds a Bachelor of Science in Engineering Chemistry from Queen’s University and a Master of Business Administration from the Schulich School of Business.

For more information about CNA2019 visit https://cna.ca/cna2019/.

CNA Responds

Response to “Pickering’s nuclear waste problem just got bigger”

Re: “Pickering’s nuclear waste problem just got bigger” (NOW Online, July 20), by Angela Bischoff, director of the Ontario Clean Air Alliance (OCAA).

Ontario Power Generation has safely stored used fuel bundles from the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station for more than 40 years. After they are removed from the water filled bays where they cool and become much less radioactive, they are placed in robust concrete and steel containers. Before being placed into storage, the containers are rigorously tested and safeguard seals are applied by an inspector from the International Atomic Energy Agency. The entire site is closely monitored by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, which is Canada’s regulator.

Despite what the article argues, Canada has a plan in place to safely manage used nuclear fuel and identify a single, preferred location for a  deep geological repository (DGR) for used nuclear fuel. Potential sites are assessed by the Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) in a process that began when the communities formally expressed interest in learning more. The NWMO has narrowed a list of 22 potential and interested host communities down to five. A single site is expected to be selected in 2023 with licensing and construction to follow. It is expected that an operational facility will be available to begin taking used fuel shipments in the mid-2040s.

John Barrett, President & CEO, Canadian Nuclear Association, Ottawa

CNA Responds

CNA response to “Nuclear energy isn’t ‘clean'”

Re: Nuclear energy isn’t ‘clean’ (Winnipeg Free Press, April 25)

Dave Taylor’s opinion piece declaring nuclear neither clean nor the future ignores the reality of decarbonization at the national and global level.

In April of 2014, the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recommended tripling the amount of energy use from renewable energy and nuclear power to keep climate change within two degrees Celsius.

The International Energy Agency in their 2016 World Energy Outlook predicted a requirement for global nuclear generation to increase by almost two and a half times by 2040.

Canada’s nuclear reactor technology and uranium exports have, over the last 30 years, contributed globally to the avoidance of at least a billion tonnes of CO2 (in displacing fossil fuel sources) – a unique and ongoing contribution to global climate change mitigation which no other Canadian energy source can claim.

Globally, nuclear power is on the upswing. According to the World Nuclear Association, there are 60 nuclear reactors currently under construction worldwide, with another 157 on order or planned, and 351 that have been proposed.

Unlike some other sources of energy, nuclear does not release its waste into the atmosphere. Spent fuel is safely stored and relies on sound science and technology. Through the Nuclear Waste Management Organization, Canada has a plan for the safe, long-term management of used nuclear fuel that is fully funded by nuclear operators in Canada.

Finally, contrary to Taylor’s statement regarding the futility of Canada’s reactor sales, it should be noted that Canada has actually sold 12 CANDU reactors to China, India, Romania, Argentina and South Korea.

John Barrett
President and CEO
Canadian Nuclear Association