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National Science and Technology Week – October 14-23, 2011

Did you know it’s National Science and Technology Week (NSTW) in Canada?

This year marks the 20th anniversary of NSTW, which celebrates the significance of Canada’s science and technology history, the importance of science and technology in today’s world, and Canada’s ongoing role as a world leader in innovation.

CLICK to learn more about Canadian innovations in nuclear at NUnuclear.ca

TalkNUclear was in Port Hope to kick off NSTW. We wanted to learn more about the historic role Port Hope has played in Canada’s nuclear industry and about plans for remediation. Read about the Port Hope Area Initiative on the TalkNUclear blog. We were lucky enough to be treated to a tour of Port Hope to learn more about some of the Port Hope Area Initiative‘s remediation and waste storage plans (hint: there’s a recreation park in the works!).

A lovely new park in the works for beautiful Port Hope

How are you celebrating NSTW?

Nuclear Science & Technology (S&T) initiatives foster excellence in science, technology, manufacturing, energy and medicine. They contribute significantly to developing highly qualified personnel for the nuclear and non-nuclear sectors.

  • Canada’s federal Government and the Canadian nuclear industry have a long history of investing in nuclear S&T and innovation.
  • Nuclear  S&T  supports materials testing and product improvements, medical products and services, training and development of scientists and engineers, and other activities of high value to an advanced economy.
  • Nuclear  S&T  also contributes to the health sciences sector by studying nanostructures to design carriers for therapeutic agents that can target cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and more.

CLICK to read about TalkNUclear's visit to AECL's Chalk River labs - home to so much of Canada's historic and ongoing nuclear S&T

We want to know what your favourite Canadian S&T innovation is. Let us know in the comments.

Happy National Science & Technology Week!

 

CNA Responds Messages Nuclear Pride Waste Management

PHAI Update Re: Different Take on PVP Program

There’s been the need to clear the air over a recent article in the Toronto Star about the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI) — a federal government program to remove the historic low-level radioactive waste from Port Hope. We blogged about it last week and on Saturday June 18, a letter from the Port Hope Area Initiative’s Mark Giles appeared in the Toronto Star.

Different take on PVP program
Published On Sat Jun 18 2011

Re: Tough Sell, June 11

The Property Value Protection (PVP) program has a specific set of criteria for homeowners and should not be confused with other programs designed to deal with the presence of low-level radioactive waste in Port Hope.

The PVP program is not designed to provide compensation for the presence of historic low-level radioactive waste on a property…

Continue reading at TheStar.com

This video on the PHAI website gives a brief overview of the PVP Program.

http://youtu.be/-439A09te4c

Messages Nuclear News Nuclear Pride

Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI) Important Part of Managing our Legacy (Waste)

This letter appeared in the Toronto Star on June 14. It’s from a resident of Port Hope who understands that low-level radioactive waste doesn’t pose a health threat and that background radiation is as natural as breathing. That doesn’t mean that the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI) is a “scam,” as he says. The government has a responsibility to clean up its legacy nuclear waste, most of which dates back to the Cold War and is unrelated to current operations in Port Hope.

The PHAI website FAQ describes low-level waste as:

In Port Hope (Ward One), low-level radioactive waste consists of soil mixed with small amounts of historic refinery waste, left over from uranium and radium refining operations in the town during the 1930s to 1970s. This contaminated soil contains slightly elevated levels of natural radioactive materials. The Welcome and Port Granby Waste Management Facilities contain residues generated at the refinery from the 1940s to 1988. Low-level radioactive waste in the Port Hope area does not come from nuclear power reactors.

The PHAI clean-up is a process started in the late 1970s, when the issue came to light. It took until 2001 to agree on an acceptable solution. There have been hundreds of consultations with residents, government and Aboriginal groups, plus extensive  environmental and public safety assessments. In fact,

each phase of the project has been, and will continue to be, subject to regulatory review and oversight by the CNSC as well as by Environment Canada, Health Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Transport Canada and several provincial ministries.

There’s also some confusion about the Property Value Protection (PVP) Program. The Program isn’t about compensating people for having historic low-level waste on their property. The PVP Program is designed to protect the property seller if they realize a loss on the sale of their property as a direct result of the clean-up project. This is part of the 2001 agreement between the federal government and Port Hope (and Clarington).

(FYI – the PVP Program is working well with 29 of 40 claims approved since 2001.)

The bottom line: the clean-up is perfectly legitimate and will have a lasting postive impact on the community. Residents of Port Hope have expressed concern about the low-level waste, the government has responded. As an industry we support the Port Hope Area Initiative because of our commitment to public safety and environmental stewardship which includes the safe, secure and responsible management of nuclear waste — from low-level waste  to used nuclear fuel from power plants. Learn about the different types of waste and how it’s managed here.

You can sign up for email updates about PHAI on their website.

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Canadian Nuclear Association Bringing Board Meeting to Port Hope

June 14, 2011 – Ottawa, Ontario – The Canadian Nuclear Association (CNA) will hold its quarterly Board meeting in Port Hope, Ontario this Fall to show support for the pivotal role the municipality plays in Canada’s nuclear industry.

“Port Hope is home to the longest-running nuclear processing facility in Canada. We want to showcase the innovative role our industry has played to build on this proud legacy of achievement, and our continued efforts to create a prosperous future for the people in the community,” said Ms. Denise Carpenter, CNA President and CEO.

“We are very pleased the CNA has chosen Port Hope as the location for their Fall meeting. The Municipality is proud to be a member of the nuclear industry community and pleased to welcome the CNA Board members. We look forward to the opportunity to showcase Port Hope as a great place to live, work and play,” said Port Hope Mayor Linda Thompson. While the agenda and details of the meeting are not yet confirmed, a familiarization tour of Port Hope will be planned for Board members that will focus on the licensed nuclear facilities, as well as the areas designated for clean up as part of the Port Hope Area Initiative.

Canadian Nuclear Association - The Voice of Canada's Nuclear Industry

The CNA represents 95 companies who work in the Canadian nuclear industry. Our opportunity is to build a better world by applying nuclear science to a broad range of uses. We are more than 70,000 Canadians, supporting nuclear medicine, exploring and mining uranium, generating power, and advancing Canada’s nuclear advantage worldwide. Please visit us online and follow us on our Blog, Twitter, and Facebook pages to participate in our “TalkNuclear” conversation.

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For more information please contact:
Kathleen Olson
Director of Communications
Canadian Nuclear Association
Olsonk@cna.ca