Tag Archives: Bruce Power

CNA2020

Getting to Net-Zero Emissions Using Nuclear: Canada’s low-carbon future

Ever wonder how Canada is going to reach net-zero emissions? Join this panel at CNA2020 as Ontario Power Generation (OPG) Senior Vice-President of Corporate Affairs Heather Ferguson, SaskPower President and CEO Mike Marsh, Bruce Power President and CEO Mike Rencheck, and NB Power CEO Gaëtan Thomas discuss how Canada can reach its low-carbon future with nuclear power.

image of Heather Ferguson
OPG Senior VP of Corporate Affairs Heather Ferguson

With over 20 years of experience in the resource development, energy and electricity sectors, Ferguson was previously the OPG’s VP of New Business Ventures, VP of Environment, and Director of Hydroelectric Business Development Group. She has a Master’s degree in Science from Queen’s University and an MBA from the Rotman School of Management.

SaskPower CEO and President Mike Marsh

President and CEO since 2015, Marsh first joined SaskPower in 1991 as an engineering supervisor before joining the corporate and financial services leadership team in 2001. In 2012, he became vice-president of operations and chief operations officer. Marsh holds a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering and an MBA.

Bruce Power President and CEO Mike Rencheck

Rencheck joined Bruce Power as president and CEO in 2016. He was the deputy chief operating officer for AREVA Group (international) after being president and CEO of AREVA Inc. in North America. Before joining AREVA, he was senior vice-president and chief nuclear officer at American Electric Power. He is a professional engineer and certified senior reactor operator.

NB Power CEO Gaëtan Thomas

Serving as CEO of NB Power since 2010, Thomas is a loyal and lifelong employee of the utility. He has worked in all aspects of the business, including as vice-president of the nuclear, distribution and customer service divisions. Thomas earned a degree in electrical engineering from the University of New Brunswick.

The CEO panel will be held Thursday, February 27, from 14:00 to 15:00. Find the complete schedule at https://cna.ca/cna2020/program/.

To register for the conference, visit https://cna.ca/cna2020/registration/.

CNA2020

CNA sponsor spotlight: Bruce Power

The Canadian Nuclear Association is proud to shine a spotlight on its CNA2020 Uranium-level sponsor, Bruce Power.

Formed in 2001 and based in Bruce County on Lake Huron, Bruce Power was Canada’s first private nuclear generator. The company is a partnership among TC Engery, OMERS Infrastructure Management Inc. (a trust established by the Ontario Municipal Employees Retirement System), The Power Workers’ Union and The Society of Energy Professionals. It operates the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station under a lease with Ontario Power Generation, which owns the site.

The Bruce station has been delivering power to the Ontario electricity grid since 1976. Now, the eight-unit station is one of the largest in the world, operating at 6,288 MWe. In 2018, Bruce generated 48.4 billion kWh, enough to power 5 million Ontario households. That’s more than 30 per cent of Ontario’s electricity.

The utility’s refurbishment of four nuclear units brought 3,000 MW of reliable, low-cost and carbon-free electricity back to the grid. That provided 70 per cent of the electricity needed for the province to phase out coal-fired generation in 2014.

Bruce Power is investing about $13 billion in private money into Units 3 to 8, which are still owned by Ontario taxpayers. The life extension began in 2016 and will continue through 2053, allowing Bruce Power’s units to operate safely through to 2064.

For more than 30 years, the four reactors at Bruce Power’s Bruce B have been a reliable source of cobalt-60 for Nordion. Sterilization cobalt-60 is the first and most widely used type of cobalt-60. It sterilizes 40 per cent of the world’s single-use medical devices, such as sutures, syringes, gowns, gloves and masks. Medical-grade cobalt-60 is used worldwide for radiation-based cancer treatments and for the treatment of complex brain conditions. Bruce Power has recently begun producing this new source of cobalt, which will ensure doctors and their patients have treatments when they need them.

The utility injects billions of dollars into Ontario’s economy annually, providing over 4,000 full-time, direct jobs to highly skilled employees, and thousands more indirectly.

Bruce Power is the sponsor of the CNA2020 welcome reception, the conference’s premier networking event. The reception will be held Wednesday, February 26, from 18:00 to 20:30. They will also host the Bruce Power Suppliers Forum from 14:00 to 16:00. Find the complete schedule at https://cna.ca/cna2020/program/.

Suppliers already registered for CNA2020 will have access to the Bruce Power Supplier Forum. Suppliers not registered can purchase a one-day package that provides access to the forum, and the CNA2020 Trade Show Opening and Welcome Reception. To register, visit https://cna.ca/cna2020/registration/.

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ONA Response to NewmarketToday Opinion Piece

Re: Ontario needs to move away from nuclear power to reduce electricity costs (November 13)

The Ontario Clean Air Alliance has once again misrepresented the cost of nuclear energy and put forward proposals that simply don’t work.

According to the OEB, the folks who create our bills, in 2019 the cost of nuclear energy was 8 cents per kWh. That’s 4.39 cents per kWh lower than the average cost to produce electricity in Ontario. Nuclear energy provided 60 per cent of Ontario’s electricity in 2018 helping to keep costs down.

Leveraging Ontario’s nuclear advantage, our province has phased-off of coal and eliminated smog days. That’s a real impact on clean air in Ontario that helps people with asthma and other respiratory illnesses enjoy a summer day and Torontonians enjoy a blue sky. This is a world-leading achievement that we must be proud of. Even Quebec, which has a large hydro fleet still has over 40 air quality warnings every year.

Refurbishing the Bruce and Darlington stations will extend their lives for decades, providing a cost-effective, long-term supply of clear electricity for Ontario. This investment in energy security for Ontario is also creating thousands of jobs within the province and generating life-saving medical isotopes in the process.

Market mechanisms in Ontario help to ensure we receive power from Quebec when we need it and when it makes economic sense. The reverse is also true. Last January, Ontario provided Quebec with more than 400 GWhs to support its winter demand for power.

Quebec simply does not have the capacity to send power to Ontario in the winter and relies on the nuclear fleet in Ontario to help keep the air as clean as possible.

Ontario is committed to a nuclear future with the life extension of the existing nuclear fleet, which is now scheduled to provide reliable and affordable electricity into 2060s.

The Financial Accountability Office (FAO) released a report that states there is currently no portfolio of alternative low emissions generation that could replace nuclear generation at a comparable cost.

The FAO report is clear: ratepayers are protected; the Ontario’s Nuclear Refurbishment plan is projected to provide ratepayers with a long-term supply of low-cost, low emissions electricity.

This transformational change in Ontario was accomplished through the strength of Ontario’s nuclear sector that provided 90 per cent of the incremental electricity needed to phase out coal.

Thankfully, today, the people of Ontario have cleaner air from cleaner energy.

With such a reliable supply of carbon-free energy being provided by Ontario’s nuclear fleet, the future is bright, and the sky is blue for Ontario residents.

Taylor McKenna, Ontario’s Nuclear Advantage

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Moltex Energy pursuing SMR build in New Brunswick

The next generation of nuclear reactors is on its way in Canada.

Small modular reactors (SMRs) are a type of reactor that are smaller than conventional nuclear reactors. They can be built in factories and delivered to power sites and remote locations for installation at a low cost.

In Ontario, both Ontario Power Generation and Bruce Power are working with companies to develop SMRs.

And in New Brunswick, two companies signed agreements with NB Power and the Government of New Brunswick as part of an effort to build a manufacturing hub and potentially a second or even third reactor at Point Lepreau.

One of these companies is Moltex Energy.

At the recent Canadian Nuclear Society conference in Ottawa, Moltex Energy Canada Chief Executive Rory O’Sullivan spoke about the company’s efforts to have a stable salt reactor available before 2030.

“We signed the agreements with NB Power and the New Brunswick government last year,” he said.

There are now 10 full-time engineers at the Moltex office in New Brunswick, with five more expected to start in the fall.

“The main objective from the New Brunswick side is understanding our technology so they can eventually build a demonstration plant,” he said. “The long-term vision is to have New Brunswick as a cluster, to build a plant there and get the local supply chain engaged in the best position to sell components as we sell reactors around the world.”

Moltex’s reactor is an SSR, short for Stable Salt Reactor. It uses molten salt fuel in conventional fuel pins. The technology can reuse spent fuel from CANDU reactors at Point Lepreau. It can store heat as thermal energy in large tanks of molten salt that can be converted to steam to create electricity and be able to operate on demand.

In severe accidents the fuel can tolerate temperatures up to 1,600 degrees before it starts to boil.
“The concept of a meltdown doesn’t really apply,” O’Sullivan said.

Companies like Moltex are among those working in Canada to build the next generation of nuclear reactors that offer more flexibility to work with renewables in clean-energy systems of the future.

“All grids around the world need more flexibility as renewables grow and as grids change and you get more electric vehicle charging spikes,” he said. “We are not just developing a reactor that runs baseload all the time. We are developing a hybrid nuclear storage solution.”

“Nuclear is going to be part of a decarbonized future grid. Our way of getting there is trying to build a nuclear solution that operates as cheaply as possible.”

Uncategorized

Nuclear industry steps in after GM layoffs

General Motors plant in Oshawa, Ontario.

Ontario’s nuclear industry has reached out to help General Motors (GM) workers affected by the company’s planned closure of their Oshawa, Ontario, plant.

On November 26, GM announced that it would close its Oshawa assembly plant the end of 2019 as part of global restructuring. The closure would affect more than 2,500 jobs at the Oshawa plant.

The layoffs will have a major impact on the Oshawa economy.  According to Unifor, the union representing GM workers, every job at the Oshawa plant is tied to seven spin-off jobs in the community.

But just four days later, Ontario’s nuclear industry stepped in to let Unifor know that it would do what it can to ease the blow to the community and workers.

Bruce Power and Ontario Power Generation (OPG) sent a joint letter to the leadership of Unifor, expressing support for workers at GM Oshawa.

“Bruce Power and Ontario Power Generation recognize the role the auto industry and the Oshawa GM plant have played in Ontario’s economy for decades and we believe that we can play a part in keeping these highly skilled people in high-paying jobs in the nuclear industry,” the letter stated.

“Skilled tradespeople and skilled workers are one of our province’s biggest assets and there is a deficit being predicted in the Ontario labour market. Bruce Power, OPG and the Ontario nuclear fleet support employment and training opportunities for skilled workers.”

At over $25 billion, the refurbishment of Ontario’s nuclear power plants is the largest clean-technology investment in the country.

The refurbishment projects will put thousands of people to work and ensure economic prosperity for the province of Ontario for years to come.

“OPG’s Darlington Refurbishment Project and Bruce Power’s Major Component Replacement (MCR) Program are the two largest infrastructure projects in Ontario. We understand the value of a trained, skilled workforce for Ontario and we look forward to playing a part in keeping Ontario’s workforce employed,” the letter concluded.

CNA2019

Innovation in action panel at CNA2019

Left to right: Jeff Lyash, Gaëtan Thomas, Mike Rencheck

On Thursday, February 28, at 2:00 p.m., Jeff Lyash, Mike Rencheck and Gaëtan Thomas will take the stage at CNA2019 to discuss new nuclear, innovation in action.

Not everyone realizes the full range of climate and health solutions offered by nuclear technology. Many of these solutions flow from the operations of nuclear utilities. Refurbishment and Major Component Replacement are sources of highly innovative advances in environmental protection, clean energy generation, and life-saving medical isotopes. New Nuclear is innovative, relevant to society’s needs, capable, job-creating, and impactful.

Jeff Lyash is President and CEO of Ontario Power Generation (OPG)  Jeff was formerly the President of CB&I Power where he was responsible for a full range of engineering, procurement and construction of multi-billion dollar electrical generation projects in both domestic and international markets. He also provided operating plant services for nuclear, coal, gas, oil and renewable generation.

Mike Rencheck is President and CEO of Bruce Power. Over the past 30+ years, Mike has served in a number of roles and most recently was the Deputy Chief Operating Officer for AREVA overseeing its extensive Global capital portfolio of nuclear and renewable projects. Prior to this, he served as President and CEO of AREVA Inc. in North America leading its diverse nuclear services business in Canada and the United States with a workforce of about 5,000 people.

Gaëtan Thomas is President and CEO of New Brunswick Power. He is a committed industry leader and agent of change, driven by his deep connection to customer and employee grassroots.

His vision for NB Power includes a made-in-New Brunswick smart grid supported by customer-centric technology and a workforce aimed at creating a greener, more sustainable province. This plan, now in its fourth year, is helping to reduce reliance on fossil fuels, lowering costs and keeping customer rates low and stable.

For more information about CNA2019 visit https://cna.ca/cna2019/.